Etymology
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lake (n.2)

"deep red coloring matter," 1610s, from French laque (15c., see lac), from which it was obtained.

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sixer (n.)

"anything associated with the number six," by 1849, from six.

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hexa- 

before vowels and in certain chemical compound words hex-, word-forming element meaning "six," from Greek hexa-, combining form of hex "six," from PIE root *sweks- (see six).

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hexagon (n.)

1560s, from Latin hexagonum, from Greek hexagonon, neuter of hexagonos "six-cornered, hexagonal," from hex "six" (see hexa-) + gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle").

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biannual (adj.)

also bi-annual; "occurring every six months, twice a year," 1837; see bi- + annual (adj.). It is distinguished in sense from biennial, but the distinction is etymologically arbitrary. Related: Biannually; bi-annually.

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semester (n.)

1827, "period or term of six months," specifically, a half-year course in a German or other Continental university, from German Semester "half-year course in a university," from Latin semestris, in cursus semestris "course of six months," from semestris, semenstris "of six months, lasting six months, half-yearly, semi-annual," from assimilated form of sex "six" (see six) + mensis "month" (see moon (n.)). The word, and the idea, were picked up in the U.S., where the German higher education system served as a model. Related: Semestral; semestrial (1701).

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malignity (n.)

late 14c., malignite, "extreme enmity or evil disposition toward another, deep-rooted spite," from Old French maligneté, from Latin malignitas "ill-will, spite," from malignus "mean, unkind," from male "badly" (see mal-) + -gnus "born," from gignere "to bear, beget," from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget." Meaning "quality of being extremely evil" is from 1530s.

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sixpence (n.)

late 14c., "sum of six pennies," from six + pence. By 1590s as the name of a specific British silver coin with a value of six pence. Sixpenny (adj.) "worth or costing six pennies" (early 15c.) had a figurative sense of "paltry, cheap, petty, worthless" by 1560s; sixpenny nails (early 15c.) cost so much per hundred.

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hexapod (n.)

"six-footed insect," 1660s, from Modern Latin hexapod-, stem of hexapodus, from Greek hex "six" (see six) + Greek pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Greek hexapous (adj.) was used only with reference to poetic meter. As an adjective from 1856.

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facilis descensus Averni 

Latin, literally "the descent of Avernus (is) easy" ["Aeneid," VI.126], in reference to Avernus, a deep lake near Puteoli and a reputed entrance to the underworld; hence, "it is easy to slip into moral ruin."

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