Etymology
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Tarzan 
name of character in a series of novels by U.S. fiction writer Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950), introduced 1914.
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geist (n.)

1871, "intellectuality," also, variously, after German, "spirit" of a place or time; "spirituality," from German Geist (see ghost (n.), and compare zeitgeist). A German word for "enthusiasm, rapture; inspiration" is begeisterung.

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Runyonesque (adj.)

by 1938 in reference to Damon Runyon (1884-1946), U.S. writer of popular crime stories featuring tough characters and underworld jargon.

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reminder (n.)

"something which reminds, one who or that which reminds," 1650s, agent noun from remind. A 17c. writer has remindless "forgetful."

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revenant (n.)

"one who returns," especially after a long absence; "a ghost, one who returns from the dead," 1814 (in "Rosanne" by Laetitia Matilda Hawkins), from French revenant (fem. revenante), noun use of present participle of revenir "to return" (see revenue).

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authorship (n.)
c. 1500, "the function of being a writer," from author (n.) + -ship. Meaning "literary origination, source of something that has an author" is attested by 1808.
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Ruy Lopez (n.)
type of chess opening, 1876, from Ruy López de Segura (fl. 1560), Spanish bishop and writer on chess, who developed it.
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satirist (n.)

"writer of satires or satirical compositions," 1580s; see satire (n.) + -ist. The earlier noun was satiric (late 14c.), from Latin satiricus.

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Chateaubriand (n.)

"grilled beef steak, garnished with herbs," 1877, named, for some reason, for French writer François René, Vicomte de Chateaubriand (1768-1848).

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bogey (n.1)
World War II aviator slang for "unidentified aircraft, presumably hostile," probably ultimately from bogge, a variant of Middle English bugge "a frightening specter" (see bug (n.)).

Thus it shares ancestry with many dialect words for "ghost, specter," such as bog/bogge (attested 16c.-17c.), bogeyman (16c.), boggart "specter that haunts a gloomy spot" (c. 1570, in Westmoreland, Lancashire, Cheshire, and Yorkshire). The earliest modern form appears to be Scottish bogle "ghost," attested from c. 1500 and popularized c. 1800 in English literature by Scott, Burns, etc.
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