Etymology
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wysiwyg 
1982, computer programmer's acronym from what you see is what you get.
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got 
past tense and one past participle form of get (v.).
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agglomerate (v.)
1680s, "collect or gather in a mass" (trans.), from Latin agglomeratus, past participle of agglomerare "to wind or add onto a ball," from ad "to" (see ad-) + glomerare "wind up in a ball," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "ball of yarn," which is of uncertain origin (see glebe). Intransitive sense "grow into a mass" is from 1730. Related: Agglomerated; agglomerating.
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chart (v.)

1837, "to enter onto a map or chart," from chart (n.). In the commercial recording sense, in reference to appearing on the chart of top-selling or most played records published in Billboard magazine, by 1961. The chart itself was printed from c. 1942. Related: Charted; charting.

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best (v.)
"to get the better of, outdo, surpass," 1863, from best (adj.). Related: Bested; besting.
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a (2)
as in twice a day, etc., a reduced form of Old English an "on" (see on (prep.)), in this case "on each." The sense was extended from time to measure, price, place, etc. The habit of tacking a onto a gerund (as in a-hunting we will go) was archaic after 18c.
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reobtain (v.)

also re-obtain, "to get again," 1580s, from re- "again" + obtain (v.). Related: Reobtained; reobtaining; reobtainable.

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jump (n.)
1550s, "an act of jumping," from jump (v.). Figurative meaning "sudden abrupt rise" is from 1650s. Meaning "abrupt transition from one point to another" is from 1670s. Sense of "a parachute descent" is from 1922. Meaning "jazz music with a strong beat" first recorded 1937, in Count Basie's "One O'Clock Jump." Jump suit "one-piece coverall modeled on those worn by paratroopers and skydivers" is from 1948. To get a jump on "get ahead, get moving" is from 1910, perhaps a figurative use from the jump-spark that ignites an engine.
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marmalade (n.)

1530s, "preserve or confection of pulpy consistence made from quince," from French marmelade, from Portuguese marmelada "quince jelly, marmalade," from marmelo "quince," by dissimilation from Latin melimelum "sweet apple," originally "fruit of an apple tree grafted onto quince," from Greek melimelon, from meli "honey" (from PIE root *melit- "honey") + mēlon "apple" (see malic). Extended 17c. to any preserve or confection of pulpy consistence made from a citrus fruit.

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planetarium (n.)

1734, "orrery, astronomical machine which by the movements of its parts represents the motions and orbits of the planets," Modern Latin, from Late Latin planeta (see planet) + Latin -arium "a place for." Sense of "device for projecting the night sky onto the interior of a dome," developed by Zeiss in Germany, debuted in Munich in 1923 and is attested by the name in English from 1929.

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