Etymology
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Falange 
Spanish political party founded 1933 as a fascist movement; see Falangist. Related: Falangista.
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redeployment (n.)

"movement or reallocation" of troops, resources, etc., 1945; see re- "again, anew" + deployment.

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side-way (n.)
also sideway, 1550s, lateral space for passage or movement," from side (n.) + way (n.).
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impetuosity (n.)
early 15c., "violent movement, rushing," from Old French impetuosité (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin impetuositatem (nominative impetuositas), from Late Latin impetuosus "impetuous, violent" (see impetuous).
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romanticism (n.)

1803, "a romantic idea," from romantic + -ism. In literature, 1823, in a French context, in reference to a movement toward medieval forms (especially in reaction to classical ones), an association now more often confined to Romanesque. The movement began in German and spread to England and France. Generalized sense of "a tendency toward romantic ideas" is recorded by 1840.

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numb (v.)

"to make numb, deprive of sensation or power of movement," 1550s (implied in numbed), from numb (adj.). Related: Numbing.

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circuity (n.)

"a movement in a circle," 1620s, from French circuite, from Medieval Latin circuitus (see circuitous) on model of gratuite, etc.

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in-migration (n.)
1942, American English, in reference to movement within the same country (as distinguished from immigration), from in (prep.) + migration.
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symbolism (n.)
1650s, "practice of representing things with symbols," from symbol + -ism. Applied to the arts by 1866; attested from 1892 as a movement in French literature, from French symbolisme (see symbolist).
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scherzo (n.)
1852, from Italian scherzo, literally "sport, joke," from scherzare "to jest or joke," from a Germanic source (compare Middle High German scherzen "to jump merrily, enjoy oneself," German scherz "sport"), from PIE *(s)ker- (2) "leap, jump about." The lively second or third movement in a multi-movement musical work. Scherzando is the Italian gerund of scherzare.
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