Etymology
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disport (n.)
Origin and meaning of disport

c. 1300, "activity that offers amusement, pleasure, or recreation," from Anglo-French disport, Old French desport, from disporter/desporter "divert, amuse" (see disport (v.)). From late 14c. as "a sport or game; the game of love, flirtation."

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lacrosse (n.)
1850, American English, from Canadian French jeu de la crosse (18c.), literally "game of the hooked sticks," from crosse "hooked stick," such as that used in the game to throw the ball. This French word is, perhaps via a Gallo-Romance *croccia, from Proto-Germanic *kruk- (see crook (n.)). Originally a North American Indian game; the native name is represented by the Ojibwa (Algonquian) verb baaga'adowe "to play lacrosse." Modern form and rules of the game were laid down 1860 in Canada.
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euchre (n.)
type of card game played with a partial deck, 1846, American English, of unknown origin. Elements of the game indicate it might be from German. In early use also uker, yucker.
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jeopardy (n.)

late 14c., jupartie , ioparde, etc., "danger, risk;" earlier "a cunning plan, a stratagem" (c. 1300), from or based on Old French jeu parti "a lost game," more correctly "a divided game, game with even chances" (hence "uncertainty"). The sense perhaps developed in Anglo-French.

This is from jeu "a game" (from Latin iocus "jest;" see joke (n.)) + parti, past participle of partir "to divide, separate" (10c.), from Latin partire/partiri "to share, part, distribute, divide," from pars "a part, piece, a share" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot"). Jeopardous "in peril" (mid-15c.) is now obsolete.

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parcheesi (n.)

backgammon-like board game for four, 1800, pachisi, from Hindi pachisi, the name of a game played on a kind of cloth chess-board with cowries for dice, from pachis "twenty-five" (the highest throw of the dice in the game), from Sanskrit panca "five" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + vinsati-s "twenty." The modern spelling outside India, with unetymological -r-, was enshrined 1892 by the trademark name.

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white feather (n.)
as a symbol of cowardice, 1785, said to be from the time when cock-fighting was respectable, and when the strain of game-cock in vogue had no white feathers, so that "having a white feather, is proof he is not of the true game breed" [Grose].
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poacher (n.)

1660s, "one who poaches game, one who intrudes on the preserves of another for the purpose of killing game unlawfully," agent noun from poach (v.1). Attested from 1846 as "vessel for poaching eggs," from poach (v.2).

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faro (n.)
18th century gambling game with cards, 1726, sometimes said to be altered from pharaoh, perhaps his image was on one of the cards, but early descriptions of the game give no indication of this and it seems to have been played with a standard deck.
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cards (n.)
"a game played with cards," mid-15c., from plural of card (n.1).
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ombre (n.)

card game originating in Spain and popular late 17c. and early 18c., 1650s, from French hombre, ombre (17c.), or directly from Spanish hombre, literally "man" (see hombre). So called from an expression (translatable as "I am the man") spoken in the course of the game. Played usually by three persons with a pack of 40 cards (the 8s, 9s, and 10s being discarded), it was supersedes as the fashionable game by quadrille.

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