Etymology
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Lewis 
masc. proper name, Anglo-French form of French Louis (see Louis).
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caitiff (n.)
c. 1300, "wicked man, scoundrel," from Anglo-French caitif, noun use of Old North French caitive (Old French chaitif) "captive, miserable" (see caitiff (adj.)). From mid-14c as "prisoner."
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jailer (n.)
also gaoler, late 14c., from Old North French gayolierre, Old French jaioleur (Modern French geôlier), agent noun from jaole/geole (see jail (n.)). Jail-keeper is attested from 1620s.
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jeweler (n.)
also jeweller, late 14c. (mid-14c. as a surname, Alice la Jueler), from Anglo-French jueler, juelleor, Old French juelier, juelior (Modern French joaillier), from joel "a jewel" (see jewel).
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trencher (n.)
"wooden platter on which to cut meat," c. 1300, from Anglo-French trenchour, Old North French trencheor "a trencher," literally "a cutting place," from Old French trenchier "to cut, carve, slice" (see trench).
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lessee (n.)
"one to whom a lease is given," late 15c., from Anglo-French lesee, Old French lessé, past participle of lesser "to let, to leave" (10c., Modern French laisser), from Latin laxare, from laxus "loose" (see lax).
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truss (v.)
c. 1200, "to load, load up," from Anglo-French trusser, Old French trusser, torser "to load, fill, pack, fasten" (11c.), from Old French trousse, torse (see truss (n.)). Related: Trussed; trussing.
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wager (n.)
c. 1300, wajour "a promise, a vow, something pledged or sworn to;" also "a bet, a wager; stakes, something laid down as a bet," from Anglo-French wageure, Old North French wagiere (Old French gagiere, Modern French gageure) "pledge, security," from wagier "to pledge" (see wage (n.)).
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saboteur (n.)

"one who commits sabotage," 1912 (from 1909 as a French word in English), a borrowing of the French agent noun from saboter (see sabotage (n.)). The French fem. form is saboteuse.

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recount (v.1)

"to tell, relate in detail," late 15c., also recompt, from Old North French and Anglo-French reconter (12c., Modern French raconter), from Old French re- "again" (see re-) + conter "to relate, reckon" (see count (v.)). Frequent in Caxton. Related: Recounted; recounting.

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