Etymology
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gesellschaft (n.)
1887, "social relationship based on duty to society or an organization," from German Gesellschaft, from geselle "companion" + -schaft "-ship."
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petitioner (n.)

early 15c., peticioner, "presenter of a formal petition, a supplicant for a favor," from petition (n.).

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naturalistic (adj.)

1840, in reference to the theological doctrine of naturalism; see natural + -istic. By 1849 as "aiming for realism, not formal or conventionalized."

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organism (n.)

1660s, "organic structure, organization" (a sense now rare or obsolete), from organize + -ism. Sense of "living animal or plant, body exhibiting organic life" is by 1842. Related: Organismic; organismal.

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reorganization (n.)

also re-organization, "act or process of organizing anew," 1801, in translations from French, from French reorganisation or a native noun of action from reorganize.

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covenant (v.)

"to enter into a formal agreement or contract," c. 1300, from covenant (n.). Related: Covenanted; covenanting. Also see covenanter.

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affiliate (n.)
1846, from affiliate (v.) via the adjective. Compare associate (n.). Affiliated society in reference to a local society connected with another or associated with a central organization is from 1795.
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Ku Klux Klan 
1867, American English, originally Kuklux Klan, a made-up name, supposedly from Greek kuklos, kyklos "circle" (see cycle (n.)) + English clan. Originally an organization of former Confederate officers and soldiers, it was put down by the U.S. military in the 1870s. Revived 1915 as a national racist Protestant fraternal organization, it grew to prominence but fractured in the 1930s. It had a smaller national revival 1950s as an anti-civil rights group, later with anti-government leanings. In late 19c. often simply Kuklux.
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inaugurate (v.)
"induct into office by formal ceremony," c. 1600, a back-formation from inauguration (q.v.) and also from Latin inauguratus, past participle of inaugurare. The etymological sense is "make a formal beginning or induction into office with suitable ceremonies" (which in ancient Rome included especially the taking of auguries). The earlier verb in English was augur (1540s). Related: Inaugurated; inaugurating; inaugurator.
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fulminate (v.)

early 15c., "publish a 'thundering' denunciation; hurl condemnation (at an offender)," a figurative use, from Latin fulminatus, past participle of fulminare "hurl lightning, lighten," figuratively "to thunder," from fulmen (genitive fulminis) "lightning flash," related to fulgor "lightning," fulgere "to shine, flash," from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn." Metaphoric sense (the oldest in English) in reference to formal condemnation is from Medieval Latin fulminare, used of formal ecclesiastical censures. Related: Fulminated; fulminating.

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