Etymology
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vigor (n.)

c. 1300, "physical strength, energy in an activity," from Anglo-French vigour, Old French vigor "force, strength" (Modern French vigueur), from Latin vigorem (nominative vigor) "liveliness, activity, force," from vigere "be lively, flourish, thrive," from PIE root *weg- "to be strong, be lively."

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chetnik (n.)

"member of a Balkan guerrilla force," 1904, from Serbian četnik, from četa "band, troop."

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telling (adj.)

"having effect or force," 1852, past-participle adjective from tell (v.).

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vitality (n.)

1590s, from Latin vitalitatem (nominative vitalitas) "vital force, life," from vitalis "pertaining to life" (see vital).

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gavage (n.)

"force-feeding of poultry for market," 1889, from French gavage, from gaver "to stuff" (17c.; see gavotte).

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Gaza 

Arabic form of Hebrew 'az "force, strength." Gaza Strip was created by the division of 1949.

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zippy (adj.)

1904, from zip (n.) "energy, force" (1900, from zip (v.1)) + -y (2).

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ARVN (n.)

acronym for Army of the Republic of Vietnam, ground military force of South Vietnam, organized 1955.

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pierced (adj.)

"penetrated, entered by force, perforated," c. 1400, past-participle adjective from pierce (v.).

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qi (n.)

in Chinese philosophy, "physical life force," 1850, said to be from Chinese qi "air, breath."

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