Etymology
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far-out (adj.)
also far out, 1887, "remote, distant;" from adverbial phrase, from far (adv.) + out (adv.). Slang sense of "excellent, wonderful," is from 1954, originally in jazz talk.
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freak-out (n.)

also freakout "bad psychedelic drug trip," or something comparable to one, 1966, from verbal phrase freak out, attested from 1965 in the drug sense (from 1902 in a sense "change, distort, come out of alignment"); see freak (n.). There is a coincidental appearance of the phrase in "Fanny Hill:"

She had had her freak out, and had pretty plentifully drowned her curiosity in a glut of pleasure .... [Cleland, "Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure," 1749]

where the sense is "she had concluded her prank."

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time-out (n.)
also time out, 1896 in sports, 1939 in other occupations; from 1980 as the name of a strategy in child discipline; from time + out.
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fold-out (n.)
larger page, inserted folded, in a book, magazine, etc., 1961, from fold (v.) + out (adv.).
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shoot-out (n.)
1953; expression shoot it out is from 1912; see shoot (v.) + out (adv.).
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brown-out (n.)
"partial blackout," 1942, based on blackout in the "dousing of lights as an air raid precaution" sense; from brown (adj.) as "not quite black."
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put-out (adj.)

"offended, angry, upset," by 1887, from the verbal phrase in the sense of "offend," attested by 1822; see put (v.) + out (adv.). Perhaps via the earlier sense of "cause to lose self-possession, disconcert" (1580s). The verbal phrase is from mid-14c. as "drive out, banish, exile;" from 1520s as "extinguish" (a fire or burning object). To put out, of a woman, "to offer oneself for sex" is attested by 1947.

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pass out (v.)

"lose consciousness," 1915, from pass (v.) + out. Probably a weakened sense from earlier meaning "to die" (1899). Meaning "to distribute" is attested from 1926. Related: Passed out.

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stand-out (n.)
also standout, "one who is eminent," 1928; as an adjective in this sense from 1932; from verbal phrase, from stand (v.) + out (adv.). Earlier it was used in a sense "labor strike" (1898). To stand out is from 1530s as "to project or seem to project," 1826 in the figurative sense "be prominent."
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walk-out (n.)
"strike," 1888, from walk (v.) + out (adv.). Phrase walk out "to leave" is attested by 1840. To walk out on a person "desert, forsake" is by 1913.
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