Etymology
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pamper (v.)

late 14c., pamperen, "to cram with food, indulge with food," probably from a Low German source such as Middle Dutch (compare West Flemish pamperen "cram with food, overindulge;" dialectal German pampen "to cram"), probably from a frequentative of the root of pap (n.1). Meaning "treat luxuriously, overindulge" (transitive) is attested by 1520s. Related: Pampered; pampering.

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pabulum (n.)

"food" for anything, "food" in its widest sense, "that which nourishes an animal or vegetable," 1670s, from Latin pabulum "fodder, food, nourishment," from PIE root *pa- "to feed" + instrumentive suffix *-dhlom. Related Pabular; pabulary; pabulous.

Pablum (1932), derived from this, is a trademark (Mead Johnson & Co.) for a soft, bland cereal used as a food for infants and weak and invalid persons, hence its figurative use (attested from 1970, first by U.S. Vice President Spiro Agnew) in reference to "mushy" political prose.

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feed (v.)
Old English fedan "nourish, give food to, sustain, foster" (transitive), from Proto-Germanic *fodjan (source also of Old Saxon fodjan, Old Frisian feda, Dutch voeden, Old High German fuotan, Old Norse foeða, Gothic fodjan "to feed"), from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Intransitive sense "take food, eat" is from late 14c. Meaning "to supply to as food" is from 1818.
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poi (n.)
1823, from Hawaiian poi "food made from taro root."
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omnivorous (adj.)

"eating food of every kind indiscriminately," 1650s, from Latin omnivorus "all-devouring," from omnis "all" (see omni-) + vorare "devour, swallow" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring"). Figurative use by 1791. Related: Omnivorously; omnivorousness.

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dog's meat (n.)

"horse flesh, offal, scraps, etc., used as food for dogs," 1590s.

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boarder (n.)
1520s, "one who has food and/or lodging at the house of another," agent noun from board (v.) in the "be supplied with food" sense. Nautical meaning "one who boards (an enemy's) ship" to attack it is from 1769, from a verbal sense derived from board (n.2).
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pittance (n.)

c. 1200, pitaunce, "pious donation to a religious house or order to provide extra food; the extra food provided," also "a small portion, scanty rations," from Old French pitance "pity, mercy, compassion; refreshment, nourishment; portion of food allowed a monk or poor person by a pious bequest," apparently literally "pity," from the source pity. Perhaps via Medieval Latin *pietantia, from an assumed verb *pietare, or otherwise derived from Latin pietas. Meaning "small amount, portion, or quantity" is attested by 1560s.

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fodder (n.)
Old English fodder "food," especially "hay, straw, or other bulk food for cattle," from Proto-Germanic *fodram (source also of Old Norse foðr, Middle Dutch voeder, Old High German fuotar, German Futter), from PIE *pa-trom, suffixed form of root *pa- "to feed."
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full (n.)
early 14c., from Old English fyllo, fyllu "fullness (of food), satiety;" also from full (adj.).
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