Etymology
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volant (adj.)

"flying," c. 1500, from French volant "able to fly," from Latin volantem (nominative volans), present participle of volare "to fly," of unknown origin. French voler, literally "to fly," in 16c. acquired a sense of "to steal," via the transitive meaning "to make fly."

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ornithopter (n.)

1908, from French ornithoptère (1908), a machine designed to fly by mechanical flapping of wings, from ornitho- + Greek pteron "wing" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly"). A mode of flight considered promising at least since Leonardo's day.

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mosquito (n.)

name given to gnat-like insects the females of which bite animals and draw blood through a piercing and sucking proboscis, 1580s, from Spanish mosquito "little gnat," diminutive of mosca "fly," from Latin musca "fly," from PIE root *mu- "gnat, fly" (compare Sanskrit maksa-, Greek myia, Old English mycg, Modern English midge, Old Church Slavonic mucha), perhaps imitative of the sound of humming insects. Related: Mosquital. Mosquito-hawk as a name for a kind of dragon-fly which preys on mosquitoes is from 1737. Mosquito-net "gauze or other fabric used as a screen against mosquitoes" is from 1745.

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fledge (v.)
"to acquire feathers," 1560s, from Old English adjective *-flycge (Kentish -flecge; in unfligge "featherless," glossing Latin implumes) "having the feathers developed, fit to fly," from Proto-Germanic *flugja- "feather" (source also of Middle Dutch vlugge, Low German flügge), from PIE *pluk- "to fly," extended form of root *pleu- "to flow." Meaning "bring up a bird" (until it can fly on its own) is from 1580s. Related: Fledged; fledging.
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Nepal 

Himalayan nation north of India and south of Tibet, from Sanskrit Nepala, said to be from nipat "to fly down" (from ni "down" + pat "to fly") + alaya "abode, house." If this is right, the reference would be to villages in mountain vales. Related: Nepalese.

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boomerang (v.)
1880, "to throw a boomerang," from boomerang (n.). Figurative sense "fly back to the starting point" is from 1900.
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apterous (adj.)

"wingless," 1775, from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + pterous, from Greek pteryx "wing" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly").

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tsetse (n.)
fly of tropical Africa, 1849, probably via South African Dutch, from a Bantu language (compare Setswana tsetse, Luyia tsiisi "flies").
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fledged (adj.)
"furnished with feathers," 1570s (in full-fledged), thus "developed, matured, able to fly;" past-participle adjective from fledge (v.).
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cantharides (n.)
late 14c., cantaride, type of beetle (the "Spanish fly"), especially as dried, ground up, and used medicinally to raise blisters, from Latin plural of cantharis, from Greek kantharis "blister-fly, a kind of beetle." Beekes says this is a derivative of kantharos, also the name of a kind of beetle, for which there is no good etymology. Their use (taken internally) as a sexual stimulant is attested by c. 1600. Related: Cantharic.
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