Etymology
Advertisement
circumfluent (adj.)

"flowing around, surrounding as a fluid," 1570s, from Latin circumfluentem (nominative circumfluens), present participle of circumfluere "to flow around," from circum "around, round about" (see circum-) + fluere (see fluent). Related: Circumfluence.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fluent (adj.)
1580s, "flowing freely" (of water), also, of speakers, "able and nimble in the use of words," from Latin fluentem (nominative fluens) "lax, relaxed," figuratively "flowing, fluent," present participle of fluere "to flow, stream, run, melt," from extended form of PIE *bhleu- "to swell, well up, overflow" (source also of Latin flumen "river;" Greek phluein "to boil over, bubble up," phlein "to abound"), an extended form of root *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell." Used interchangeably with fluid (adj.) in 17c. in the sense "changeable, not rigid." Related: Fluently.
Related entries & more 
rapids (n.)

"swift current in a river where the channel is descending," 1765, from French rapides (see rapid); applied by French voyagers to rough, swift-flowing reaches in North American rivers.

Related entries & more 
undercurrent (n.)
1660s, "stream of water or air flowing beneath the surface or beneath another current," a hybrid formed from under + current (n.). The figurative sense of "suppressed or underlying character" is attested from 1817.
Related entries & more 
efflux (n.)
1640s, "act or state of flowing out," also "that which flows out," from Latin effluxus, noun use of past participle of effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent)
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Danube 

major river of Europe flowing into the Black Sea (German Donau, Hungarian Duna, Russian Dunaj), from Latin Danuvius (Late Latin Danubius), from Celtic *danu(w)-yo-, from PIE *danu- "river" (compare Don, Dnieper, Dniester). Related: Danubian.

Related entries & more 
Bethesda 
1857, name of a pool in Jerusalem (John v.2), from Greek Bethesda, from Aramaic (Semitic) beth hesda "house of mercy," or perhaps "place of flowing water." Popular among some Protestant denominations as a name for religious meeting houses.
Related entries & more 
confluence (n.)

early 15c., "a flowing together, especially of two or more streams," from Late Latin confluentia, from Latin confluentem (nominative confluens), present participle of confluere "to flow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent).

Related entries & more 
rheo- 

word-forming element meaning "current of a stream," but from late 19c. typically in reference to the flow or adjustment of electric current, from Greek rheos "a flowing, stream, current," which is related to rhein "to flow," rhythmos "rhythm" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow").

Related entries & more 
manga (n.)

"Japanese comic books or graphic novels," c. 1984, from Japanese, "cartoon, caricature," literally "involuntary pictures." A term said to have been coined 1814 by artist Katsushika Hokusai to "convey a sense of free-flowing composition and quirky style." Also see anime.

Related entries & more 

Page 4