Etymology
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destine (v.)

mid-14c., destinen, "set apart, ordain or appoint to a use," from Old French destiner (12c.), from Latin destinare "make fast or firm, establish," from de- "completely, formally" (see de-) + -stinare (related to stare "to stand") from PIE *steno-, suffixed form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

Originally in English of the actions of deities, fate, etc.; of human choices or actions, "predetermine, as by divine decree," from early 16c. Related: Destined.

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Smith & Wesson 

proprietary name of a type of firearm, 1860, from the gunsmith firm of Horace Smith (1808-1893) and Daniel B. Wesson (1825-1906) in Springfield, Massachusetts.

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consistence (n.)

1590s, "state of standing still; firmness," from French consistence (Modern French consistance) "a standing fast," from Medieval Latin consistentia, literally "a standing together," from Latin consistentem (nominative consistens), present participle of consistere "to stand firm, take a standing position, stop, halt," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sistere "to place," causative of stare "to stand, be standing" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Meaning "coherence, solidity, state or degree of density" is recorded from 1620s.

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subsist (v.)

1540s, "to exist;" c. 1600, "retain the existing state," from French subsister and directly from Latin subsistere "to stand still or firm, take a stand, take position; abide, hold out," from sub "under, up to" (see sub-) + sistere "to assume a standing position, stand still, remain; set, place, cause to stand still" (from PIE *si-st-, reduplicated form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Meaning "to support oneself" (in a certain way) is from 1640s. Related: Subsisted; subsisting.

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instable (adj.)

c. 1400, from Latin instabilis "unsteady, not firm, inconstant, fickle," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + stabilis (see stable (adj.)). Now mostly replaced by unstable.

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solid (adj.)

late 14c., "not empty or hollow," from Old French solide "firm, dense, compact," from Latin solidus "firm, whole, undivided, entire," figuratively "sound, trustworthy, genuine," from PIE *sol-ido-, suffixed form of root *sol- "whole."

Meaning "firm, hard, compact" is from 1530s. Meaning "entirely of the same stuff" is from 1710. Of qualities, "well-established, considerable" c. 1600. As a mere intensifier, 1830. Slang sense of "wonderful, remarkable" first attested 1920 among jazz musicians. As an adverb, "solidly, completely," 1650s. Solid South in U.S. political history is attested from 1858. Solid state as a term in physics is recorded from 1953; meaning "employing printed circuits and solid transistors" (as opposed to wires and vacuum tubes) is from 1959. Related: Solidly.

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trim (adj.)

c. 1500, "neatly or smartly dressed," probably ultimately from trim (v.) or from related Old English trum "firm, fixed, secure, strong, sound, vigorous, active." Related: Trimly; trimness.

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ram (v.)

c. 1300, "to beat with a heavy implement, make the ground firm by tamping," from ram (n.). By 1864 as "dash violently against, strike with great force." Related: Rammed; ramming.

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co. 

by 1670s as an abbreviation of company in the business sense, indicating the partners in the firm whose names do not appear in its name. Hence and co. to indicate "the rest" of any group (1757).

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consist (v.)

1520s, "to be, exist in a permanent state as a body composed of parts," from French consister (14c.) or directly from Latin consistere "to stand firm, take a standing position, stop, halt," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sistere "to place," causative of stare "to stand, be standing" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm").

From 1560s, with of, as "be composed, be made up." From 1630s as "be consistent." Related: Consisted; consisting.

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