Etymology
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fireproof (adj.)

also fire-proof, 1630s, from fire (n.) + proof. As a verb, from 1867. Related: Fireproofed; fireproofing.

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ignite (v.)

1660s (trans.), "kindle or set on fire, cause to burn," from Latin ignitus, past participle of ignire "set on fire, make red hot," from ignis "fire" (see igneous). Attested earlier as an adjective (1550s). Intransitive sense of "catch fire, begin to burn" is from 1818. Related: Ignited; igniting.

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afire (adv., adj.)

"on fire," c. 1200, afure, from a- (1) "on" + fire (n.). Figurative use by late 14c.

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campfire (n.)

also camp-fire, "fire in a camp for warmth or cooking," 1835, from camp (n.) + fire (n.). In the GAR (Civil War Northern veterans' society), "a meeting or reunion of members of a post" (1874).

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bonfire (n.)

late 14c., bonfir, banefire, "a fire in which bones are burned;" see bone (n.) + fire (n.). The original specific sense became obsolete and was forgotten by 18c. The general sense of "large open-air fire from any material for public amusement or celebration" is by mid-16c. and that of "large fire for any purpose" from 17c.

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firebug (n.)

also fire-bug, "arsonist, incendiary," 1869, from fire (n.) + bug (n.) in the "obsessed person" sense.

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firewater (n.)

also fire-water, "alcoholic liquor," 1826, American English, supposedly from speech of American Indians, from fire (n.) + water (n.1).

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pyrite (n.)

"metallic iron disulfide," occurring naturally in cubes and crystals, "fool's gold," 1550s, from Old French pyrite (12c.), from Latin pyrites, from Greek pyritēs lithos "stone of fire, flint" (so called because it glitters), from pyritēs "of or in fire," from pyr (genitive pyros) "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire"). Related: Pyritic.

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hellfire (n.)

also hell-fire, "the fire of Hell, eternal torment," from Old English hellefyr, in which helle is the genitive case of hell. It translates Greek gehenna tou pyros, literally "hell of fire." Also used in Middle English for "erysipelas" (mid-15c.).

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fireman (n.)

also fire-man, late 14c., "tender of a fire," from fire (n.) + man (n.). From 1650s as "furnace-tender" of a early steam engine. As "person hired to put out (rather than tend) fires" it is attested from 1714. For "stoker," Old English had fyrbeta.

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