Etymology
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firewall (n.)
also fire-wall, 1851 as a physical wall meant to prevent the spread of fire in a structure, from fire (n.) + wall (n.). Computer sense (originally figurative) is by 1990.
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fireworks (n.)
also fire-works, "pyrotechnic contrivances," 1570s, from fire (n.) + works. Figurative use from 1660s.
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igneo- 
word-forming element meaning "of fire; of fire and; of igneous origin," from Latin igneus (see igneous).
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surefire (adj.)
also sure-fire, by 1864, American English, from sure + fire (v.). Originally of rifles.
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ignite (v.)

1660s (trans.), "kindle or set on fire, cause to burn," from Latin ignitus, past participle of ignire "set on fire, make red hot," from ignis "fire" (see igneous). Attested earlier as an adjective (1550s). Intransitive sense of "catch fire, begin to burn" is from 1818. Related: Ignited; igniting.

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fireproof (adj.)
also fire-proof, 1630s, from fire (n.) + proof. As a verb, from 1867. Related: Fireproofed; fireproofing.
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firebug (n.)
also fire-bug, "arsonist, incendiary," 1869, from fire (n.) + bug (n.) in the "obsessed person" sense.
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pyrite (n.)

"metallic iron disulfide," occurring naturally in cubes and crystals, "fool's gold," 1550s, from Old French pyrite (12c.), from Latin pyrites, from Greek pyritēs lithos "stone of fire, flint" (so called because it glitters), from pyritēs "of or in fire," from pyr (genitive pyros) "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire"). Related: Pyritic.

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*ater- 
*āter-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "fire." It forms all or part of: atrabiliary; atrabilious; atrium; atrocious.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Old Persian atar "fire;" Latin ater "black" ("blackened by fire"), atrox "frightful" ("of fiery or threatening appearance").
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campfire (n.)

also camp-fire, "fire in a camp for warmth or cooking," 1835, from camp (n.) + fire (n.). In the GAR (Civil War Northern veterans' society), "a meeting or reunion of members of a post" (1874).

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