Etymology
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microfiche (n.)

"flat piece of film containing micrographs of the pages of a book, etc.," 1950, from French microfiche, from micro- + French fiche "slip of paper" (see fiche).

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halogen (n.)
general name for elements of the chlorine family, 1842, from Swedish, coined by Swedish chemist Baron Jöns Jakob Berzelius (1779-1848), literally "salt-producer," from Greek hals "salt" (from PIE root *sal- "salt") + -gen "giving birth to" (see -gen); so called because a salt is formed in reactions involving these four elements. Related: Halogenous.
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generator (n.)
1640s, "person who begets, causes, or produces," from Latin generator "a begetter, producer," agent noun from past participle stem of generare "to bring forth" (see generation). Meaning "machine that generates power" first recorded 1794; sense of "machine that generates electric energy" is from 1879. Fem. generatrix attested from 1650s.
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Cannes 
city on the French Riviera, perhaps from a pre-Indo-European word *kan, meaning "height." The film festival dates from 1946.
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track (v.)
"to follow or trace the footsteps of," 1560s, from track (n.). Meaning "leave a footprint trail in dirt, mud, etc." is from 1838. Of film and TV cameras, 1959. Related: Tracked; tracking.
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script (v.)

1935, "adapt (a written work) for broadcasting or film," from script (n.). Figurative sense, "following prescribed directions," is by 1977. Related: Scripted; scripting.

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reel (n.1)

"cylinder or frame turning on an axis," especially one on which thread, yarn, string, etc. is wound after being spun, Middle English rele, from late Old English reol, hreol "reel for winding thread," from Proto-Germanic *hrehulaz; probably related to hrægel "garment," and Old Norse hræll "spindle" (from PIE *krek- "to weave, beat;" source also of Greek krokus "nap of cloth").

Specifically of the fishing rod attachment from 1726. Of a film projector apparatus from 1896, hence in movie jargon "a length of film wound on one reel" as a part of a whole motion picture. With a number (two-reeler, typical of snort comedy, etc.) indicating film length (by 1916). Reel-to-reel as a type of tape deck is attested from 1958.

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thread (v.)
"to put thread through a needle," mid-14c., from thread (n.); in reference to film cameras from 1913. The dancing move called thread the needle is attested from 1844. Related: Threaded; threading.
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plating (n.)

1825, "the art or operation of covering articles with a thin coating or film of metal;" 1833, "thin coating of one metal laid upon another," verbal noun from plate (v.).

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pushmi-pullyu (n.)

fictional two-headed mammal from "Dr. Dolittle" (1922), coined by Hugh Lofting from the expressions push me, pull you. Popularized by the 1967 film version of the book.

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