Etymology
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ullage (n.)
"amount by which a cask or bottle falls short of being full," late 15c., from Anglo-French ulliage (early 14c.), Anglo-Latin oliagium (late 13c.), Old French ouillage, from ouiller "to fill up (a barrel) to the bung," literally "to fill to the eye," from ueil "eye" (perhaps used colloquially for "bung"), from Latin oculus (from PIE root *okw- "to see").
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manipulation (n.)
Origin and meaning of manipulation

by 1730, a method of digging ore, from French manipulation, from manipule "handful" (a pharmacists' measure), from Latin manipulus "handful, sheaf, bundle," from manus "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand") + root of plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). Sense of "skillful handling of objects" is attested by 1826; extended 1828 to "handling or managing of persons," especially to one's own advantage.

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perfume (v.)

1530s, "to fill with smoke or vapor," from perfume (n.) or from French parfumer. Meaning "to impart a sweet scent to" is from 1530s. Related: Perfumed; perfuming.

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expletive (adj.)
mid-15c., in grammar, "correlative," from Latin expletivus "serving to fill out" (see expletive (n.)).
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sate (v.)

"to satisfy, fill full, surfeit," c. 1600, probably an alteration (by influence of Latin satiare "satiate") of Middle English saden "become weary or indifferent; satiate," from Old English sadian "to satiate, fill; be sated, get wearied" (see sad (adj.)), ultimately from PIE root *sa- "to satisfy." Related: Sated; sating.

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overcrowd (v.)

also over-crowd, "fill or crowd to excess," 1766, from over- + crowd (v.). Related: Overcrowded; overcrowding.

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pleio- 

also pleo-, word-forming element meaning "more," from Greek pleiōn "larger, greater in quantity, the more part, very many" (comparative of polys "much"), from PIE *ple- (source also of Latin plere "to fill," plebes, "the populace, the common people;" Greek plēthein "be full," plērēs "full"), possibly a variant of root *pele- (1) "to fill."

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repoint (v.)

1834 in masonry, "point (a wall) again," from re- "again" + point (v.) "seal or fill openings or joints." Related: Repointed; repointing.

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sand (v.)
late 14c., "to sprinkle with sand," from sand (n.); from 1620s as "to bury or fill in with sand." Meaning "to grind or polish with sand" is from 1858. Related: Sanded; sanding.
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stuff (v.)
mid-14c., "furnish with" (goods, provisions, etc.), also "reinforce" (troops), from Old French estofer "pad, upholster, fit out" (Modern French étoffer), from estoffe, and probably also in part from stuff (n.).

From c. 1400 as "fill, cram full; fill (the belly) with food or drink, gorge;" from early 15c. as "to clog" (the sinuses, etc.); from late 14c. as "fill (a mattress, etc.) with padding, line with padding;" also in the cookery sense, in reference to filing the interior of a pastry or the cavity of a fowl or beast. The ballot-box sense is attested from 1854, American English; in expressions of contempt and suggestive of bodily orifices, it dates from 1952.
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