Etymology
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ellipsoid (n.)

in geometry, "a solid figure, all planes of which are ellipses or circles," 1721; see ellipse + -oid. From 1861 as an adjective (earlier adjective was ellipsoidal, 1831).

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septangle (n.)

"geometric figure having seven sides and seven angles," 1550s, from Late Latin septangulus, from Latin sept- "seven" (see septi-) + angulus "angle" (see angle (n.)). Related: Septangular.

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antimetabole (n.)

"rhetorical figure in which the same words are repeated in reverse order," 1590s, from Greek antimetabolē, from anti "opposite" (see anti-) + metabolē "turning about" (see metabolism).

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step-dance (n.)

one in which the steps are more important than the figure, especially one with difficult steps, 1857, from step (n.) + dance (n.). Related: Step-dancing (1872).

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personification (n.)

"figure of speech or artistic representation in which something inanimate or abstract takes the form of a person," 1755, noun of action from personify. Sense of "embodiment of a quality in a person" is attested from 1807.

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paraph (n.)

"figure formed by a flourish of a pen at the conclusion of a signature" (a precaution against forgers), 1580s, from French parafe, paraphe "a paragraph, signature, a flourish," a shortened form of paragraph.

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Messalina 

"scheming, licentious, sexually voracious woman," by 1795, in reference to Valeria Messalina (died 48 C.E.), notorious third wife of the Roman emperor Claudius, long a figure of vanity and immorality.

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stripling (n.)

"a youth," late 14c., of uncertain origin, possibly from strip (n.1) "long, narrow piece," on the notion of "one who is slender as a strip, whose figure is not yet filled out" + -ling.

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solid (n.)

late 14c., "three-dimensional figure," from solid (adj.). Meaning "a solid substance" is from 1690s. Compare also solidus; Latin solidus (adj.) was used as a noun meaning "an entire sum; a solid body."

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specter (n.)

c. 1600, "frightening ghost," from French spectre "an image, figure, ghost" (16c.), from Latin spectrum "appearance, vision, apparition" (see spectrum). Figurative sense "object of dread" is from 1774.

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