Etymology
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colloquial (adj.)

1751, "pertaining to conversation," from colloquy "a conversation" + -al (1). From 1752 as "peculiar or appropriate to the language of common speech or familiar conversation," especially as distinguished from elegant or formal speech. Related: Colloquially.

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locution (n.)

"style of speech," early 15c., from Latin locutionem (nominative locutio) "a speaking, speech, discourse; way of speaking," noun of action from past-participle stem of loqui "to speak," from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak." Related: Locutionary.

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gammadion (n.)
ornamental figure formed of four capital gammas, Medieval Greek gammadion, diminutive of Greek gamma (see gamma).
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disfigure (v.)
Origin and meaning of disfigure

late 14c., "mar the external figure of, impair the beauty, symmetry, or excellence of," also "transform the appearance of, disguise," from Old French desfigurer "disfigure, alter, disguise, destroy," from Medieval Latin diffigurare, from assimilated form of Latin dis- (see dis-) + figurare "to form, shape," from figura "a shape, form, figure" (from PIE root *dheigh- "to form, build"). Related: Disfigured; disfiguring; disfiguration.

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scrollwork (n.)

"ornamental work in which scrolls or scroll-like lines figure," 1822, from scroll (n.) + work (n.).

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schematize (v.)

"formulate in a regular order," 1866, from Latinized form of Greek skhēmatizein, from stem of skhēma "figure, appearance" (see scheme (n.)). Related: Schematization.

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frankness (n.)
"plainness of speech, candor," 1550s, from frank (adj.) + -ness.
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oration (n.)

late 14c., oracioun, "a prayer," from Late Latin orationem (nominative oratio) "a speaking, speech, discourse; language, faculty of speech, mode of expressing; prayer," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin ōrare "to pray to, plead, speak before an assembly" (see orator). The usual Old French form was oraison. Meaning "formal speech, discourse, eloquent or weighty address" is recorded from c. 1500.

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peroration (n.)

mid-15c., peroracioun, "a speech, an address," in rhetoric, "the concluding part of an address," involving an emphatic restatement of the principal points, from Latin perorationem (nominative peroratio) "the ending of a speech or argument of a case," from past-participle stem of perorare "argue a case to the end, bring a speech to a close," from per "to the end," hence "thoroughly, completely" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ōrare "to speak, plead" (see orator).

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oval (n.)

1560s, "a plane figure in the general shape of the lengthwise outline of an egg," from French ovalle "oval figure," from noun use of Medieval Latin ovalis "of or pertaining to an egg," from Latin ovum "egg" (see ovary). The earliest use of the word in English (mid-15c.) was in reference to a Roman crown awarded as the symbol of an ovatio (see ovation).

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