Etymology
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meconium (n.)

"dark fecal discharge from a newborn infant," 1706, from Latin meconium "excrement of a newborn child," literally "poppy juice," from Greek mēkōnion "poppy-juice, opium," diminutive of mēkōn "poppy," which perhaps is related to Old Church Slavonic maku, German Mohn "poppy," and is perhaps of Pre-Greek origin. "As the poppy originates from the Mediterranean according to botanists, it is often thought that we are dealing with a 'Wanderwort', which was borrowed into lndoEuropean at PIE date" [Beekes]. The discharge was so called by classical physicians for its resemblance. Related: Meconial.

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lake (n.2)
"deep red coloring matter," 1610s, from French laque (15c., see lac), from which it was obtained.
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plasticity (n.)

"capability of being molded or formed; property of giving form or shape to matter," 1768, from plastic (adj.) + -ity.

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long (n.)
in long and short of it "the sum of the matter in a few words," c. 1500, from long (adj.).
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optimistic (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, or characterized by optimism; disposed to take the most hopeful view of a matter," 1845, from optimist + -ic. Related: Optimistical (1809); optimistically.

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protoplanet (n.)

"large, diffuse cloud of matter in the orbit of a young star, regarded as the preliminary state of a planet," 1949, from proto- + planet.

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toss-up (n.)
"even matter," 1809, from earlier sense of "a flipping of a coin to arrive at a decision" (c. 1700), from verbal phrase, from toss (v.) + up (adv.).
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rheology (n.)

"study of the deformation of the flow of matter," 1929, from French rhéologie; see rheo- "current of a stream" + -logy "study of." Related: Rheologist; rheological.

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matterless (adj.)
late 14c., "insubstantial, immaterial, without physical substance," from matter (n.) + -less. From 1610s as "devoid of sense or meaning."
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pertinency (n.)

"quality of being relevant to the matter in hand," 1590s, from stem of Latin pertinens "pertaining," present participle of perinere (see pertain) + -cy.

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