Etymology
Advertisement
phonophobia (n.)

"intolerance or dread of loud sounds," 1877, from phono- "sound" + -phobia "fear."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
psychrophobia (n.)

"dread of or morbid sensitivity to anything cold," especially cold water, 1727, from psychro- "cold" + -phobia "fear."

Related entries & more 
pantophobia (n.)

"morbid fear of everything," attested by 1848 in medical journals for a psychological condition described as "monomania, with fear and terror," from Greek pantos, neuter genitive of pas "all" (see pan-) + -phobia. Earlier (by 1819) it was noted as an old word for "hydrophobia, rabies." Related: Pantophobe; pantophobic.

Related entries & more 
agoraphobia (n.)

"fear of crossing open spaces," 1873, from German Agorophobie, coined 1871 by Berlin psychiatrist Carl Westphal from Greek agora "place of assembly, city market" (but here with the general sense "open space;" see agora) + -phobia "fear." Related: Agoraphobe; agoraphobic.

Related entries & more 
acrophobe (n.)
"one suffering from a morbid fear of heights," 1895, from acrophobia; also see -phobe. Related: Acrophobic.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
timorous (adj.)

early 15c., from Old French temoros (14c.), from Medieval Latin timorosus "fearful," from Latin timor "fear, dread, apprehension, anxiety; religious awe, reverence," from timere "to fear, be afraid, dread," of unknown origin. Some early senses in English seem to show confusion with Middle English temerous "rash" (see temerity). Related: Timorously; timorousness.

Related entries & more 
xenophobia (n.)
1903, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phobia "fear." Earlier (c. 1884) it meant "agoraphobia."
Related entries & more 
Judaeophobia (n.)
"fear or hatred of the Jews; dread of their influence and opposition to their citizenship," 1881, from Judaeo- + -phobia. Related: Judaeophobe; Judaeophobic.
Related entries & more 
dire (adj.)

"causing or attended by great fear, dreadful, awful," 1560s, from Latin dirus "fearful, awful, boding ill," a religious term, which is of unknown origin. Apparently a dialect word in Latin; perhaps from Oscan and Umbrian and perhaps cognate with Greek deinos "terrible," Sanskrit dvis- 'hate, enmity, enemy," from PIE root *dwei-, forming words for "fear; hatred."

Related entries & more 
scare (n.)

1520s, "something that frightens, a scarecrow;" 1540s, "sudden panic, sudden terror inspired by a trifling cause, false alarm," from scare (v.). The earlier form was Middle English sker "fear, dread, terror, fright" (c. 1400). Scare tactic "attempt to manipulate public opinion by exploitation of fear" is by 1948.

Related entries & more 

Page 4