Etymology
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wuss (n.)

1982, abbreviated from wussy.

Mike Damone: "You are a wuss: part wimp, and part pussy"
["Fast Times at Ridgemont High" script, 1982]
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religate (v.)

"bind together," 1590s from Latin religatus, past participle of religare "fasten, bind fast" (see rely). Also sometimes an obsolete spelling of relegate. Related: Religated; religating; religation.

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interceptor (n.)
1590s, from Latin interceptor "interceptor, usurper, embezzler," agent noun from intercipere (see intercept (v.)). As a type of fast fighter aircraft, from 1930. Intercepter is attested from c. 1600.
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Percheron (n.)

type of horse, large and stout but relatively free in action, by 1875, from French Percheron, adjective formed from le Perche, region south of Normandy where horses were bred that were strong, light, and fast.

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snapshot (n.)
also snap-shot, 1808, "a quick shot with a gun, without aim, at a fast-moving target," from snap + shot (n.). Photographic sense is attested from 1890. Figuratively, of something captured at a moment in time, from 1897.
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curricular (adj.)

1798, "pertaining to driving or carriages;" from Latin curriculum "fast chariot" (from currere "to run, move quickly;" from PIE root *kers- "to run") + -ar. From 1881 in reference to systems of education.

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tenacity (n.)

early 15c., tenacite, "quality of holding firmly," from Old French ténacité (14c.) and directly from Latin tenacitas "an act of holding fast," from tenax (genitive tenacis) "holding fast, gripping, clingy; firm, steadfast," from tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch").  The PIE root produced two Latin verbs, tenere "to hold, grasp," and tendere "to stretch" (as in tend (v.1)), which perhaps is from an inflected form in the PIE verb. Both Latin verbs have past participle tentus.

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whippet (n.)
small, fast type of dog, c. 1600, probably from whip (v.) in the sense of "move quickly" + diminutive suffix -et. Used earlier (1540s) in reference to "a brisk, nimble woman."
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clinch (v.)

1560s, "fix securely (a driven nail) by bending and beating it back," a variant of clench (q.v.). The sense of "settle decisively" is first recorded 1716, from the notion of "clinching" the point of a nail to keep it fast. Boxing sense is from 1860. Related: Clinched; clinching.

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moorings (n.)

1744, "ropes, etc., by which a floating thing is confined or made fast," from mooring. Figurative sense of "that to which anything is fastened or by which it is held" is by 1851.

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