Etymology
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amass (v.)
late 15c., "to heap up for oneself," from Old French amasser "bring together, assemble, accumulate" (12c.), from à "to" (see ad-) + masser, from masse "lump, heap, pile" (from PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit"). Related: Amassed; amassing; amassable.
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novelty (n.)

late 14c., novelte, "quality of being new," also "a new manner or fashion, an innovation; something new or unusual," from Old French novelete "newness, innovation, change; news, new fashion" (Modern French nouveauté), from novel "new" (see novel (adj.)). Meaning "newness" is attested from late 14c.; sense of "useless but decorative or amusing object" is attested by 1888 (as in novelty shop, by 1893). An earlier word was novelry (c. 1300).

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catwalk (n.)

1874, "long, narrow footway," from cat (n.) + walk (n.); in reference to such narrowness of passage that one has to cross as a cat walks. Originally especially of ships and theatrical back-stages; application to fashion show runways is by 1942.

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urbanity (n.)

1530s, from French urbanité (14c.) and directly from Latin urbanitatem (nominative urbanitas) "city life; life in Rome; refinement, city fashion or manners, elegance, courtesy," also "wit, raillery, trickery," from urbanus (see urban).

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nicely (adv.)

early 14c., niceli, "foolishly," from nice (q.v.) + -ly (2). In Middle English also "foolishly; stupidly; extravagantly; wickedly." From c. 1600 as "scrupulously;" 1714 as "in an agreeable fashion."

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transfigure (v.)
early 13c., from Old French transfigurer "change, transform" (12c.), and directly from Latin transfigurare "change the shape of," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + figurare "to form, fashion," from figura "to form, shape," from figura "a shape, form, figure" (from PIE root *dheigh- "to form, build"). Related: Transfigured; transfiguring.
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shocking (adj.)
1690s, "offensive," present-participle adjective from shock (v.1). From 1704 as "causing a jolt of indignation, horror, etc.;" from 1798 as "so bad as to be shocking." Related: Shockingly. Shocking pink introduced February 1937 by Italian-born fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli.
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poulaine 

"long-pointed toe of a shoe," mid-15c., from Old French Poulaine, literally "Poland," hence "in the Polish fashion." The style was supposed in Western Europe to have originated there. Compare Cracow.

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ideo- 
word-forming element variously used with reference to images or to ideas, from Greek idea "form; the look of a thing; a kind, sort, nature; mode, fashion," in logic, "a class, kind, sort, species" (see idea).
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pinafore (n.)

1782, "sleeveless apron worn by children," originally to protect the front of the dress, from pin (v.) + afore "on the front." So called because it was originally pinned to a dress front. Later a fashion garment for women (c. 1900).

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