Etymology
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smacker (n.)

"money," c. 1918, American English slang, perhaps from smack (v.1) on notion of something "smacked" into the palm of the hand. Extended form smackeroo is attested from 1939.

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macaw (n.)

species of large, long-tailed American parrots, 1660s, from Portuguese macau, from a word in a Brazilian language, perhaps Tupi macavuana, which may be the name of a type of palm tree the fruit of which the birds eat.

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sallow (n.)

type of tall, shrubby willow plant of the Old World, Middle English saloue, from Old English sealh (Anglian salh), from Proto-Germanic *salhjon (source also of Old Norse selja, Old High German salaha, and the first element in the German compound Salweide).

This is reconstructed to be from PIE *sal(i)k- "willow" (source also of Latin salix "willow" (taken in botany as the genus name), Middle Irish sail, Welsh helygen, Breton halegen "willow"). French saule "willow" is from Frankish salha, from the Germanic root. It was used in Palm Sunday processions and decorations in England before the importing of real palm leaves began.

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sago (n.)

"starchy foodstuff made of the piths of palms," 1570s, via Portuguese and Dutch from Malay (Austronesian) sagu, the name of the palm tree from which it is obtained (attested in English in this sense from 1550s). Also borrowed in French (sagou), Spanish (sagu), German (Sago).

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coco (n.)

"palm tree," 1550s, from Spanish and Portuguese coco "grinning or grimacing face," on resemblance of the three depressions at the base of the shell to a monkey or human face. The earlier word for it was the Latinized form cocus, which sometimes was Englished as cocos.

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foist (v.)

1540s, probably from Dutch vuisten "take in hand," from Middle Dutch vuist "fist" (see fist (n.)). Earliest sense was cheating at dice by concealing a loaded one in the palm of the hand with the intention of introducing it into play; general meaning "introduce surreptitiously, work in by a trick" is from 1560s. Related: Foisted; foisting.

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effleurage (n.)

"gentle rubbing with the palm of the hand," 1886, from French effleurage, from effleurer "to graze, touch lightly, touch upon, strip the leaves off," from ef- "out" (see ex-) + fleur as in the phrase à fleur de "on a level with," from German Flur "a plain, field, meadow" (see floor (n.)).

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pronation (n.)

"act or result of pronating, the prone position of the fore limb in which the bones of the forearm are more or less crossed and the palm of the hand is turned downward," 1660s, from French pronation, from Medieval Latin pronationem (nominative pronatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin pronare "to bend forward," from pronus "prone" (see prone).

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rattan 

also ratan, type of climbing palm with tough, flexible stems that are economically valuable for making chair-bottoms, walking sticks, baskets, etc., 1650s, from Malay (Austronesian) rotan, rautan, according to OED from raut "to trim, strip, peel, pare."

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grease (v.)

mid-14c., "smear, lubricate, or anoint with grease or fat," from grease (n.). Sense of "ply with bribe or protection money" is 1520s, from notion of grease the wheels "make things run smoothly" (mid-15c.). To grease (someone's) palm is from 1580s. Expression greased lightning, representing something that goes very fast, is American English, by 1832.

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