Etymology
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Buckinghamshire 
Old English Buccingahamscir, from Buccingahamme (early 10c.), "River-bend land of the family or followers of a man called Bucca."
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Stammbaum (n.)
German, "family tree," especially of languages, 1939, from Stamm "tree, trunk" (see stem (n.)) + Baum "tree" (see beam (n.)).
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ox-tongue (n.)

also oxtongue, "plant of the borage family with rough, tongue-shaped leaves," early 14c., oxe-tunge, from ox + tongue (n.).

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Battenberg (n.)
type of cake, 1903, from name of a town in Germany, the seat of a family which became known in Britain as Mountbatten.
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Seljuk 

Turkish dynastic family of 11c.-13c., c. 1600 (implied in Selzuccian), from Turkish Seljuq, name of the reputed ancestor of the dynasty.

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gypsophila (n.)
genus of the pink family, 1771, from Modern Latin (Linnaeus), from Greek gypsos "chalk, gypsum" (see gypsum) + philein "to love" (see philo-).
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Muskogean 

Native American language family of the southeastern U.S., 1890, from Muskogee, name of the Creek and related tribes (1775), from Creek maskoki.

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double-bass (n.)

string instrument, the largest and deepest instrument of the viol family, by 1728; see double (adj.) + bass (n.2).

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Medici 

Italian family that ruled Florence during the 15c., originally the plural of medico "a physician," from Latin medicus (see medical (adj.)). Related: Medicean.

[A]n illustrious family of Florence, appearing first as merchants of the medieval republic, and at the dawn of the Renaissance, in the fifteenth century, raised to supreme power through their liberality and merit. From this time on for three centuries, amid fortunes of varying brilliancy, this family produced popes, sovereigns, and tyrants, and it occupies a large place in the history of Europe. In the fine arts and literature the epithet has particular reference to Cosimo dei Medici, known as Cosimo the Elder, and to Lorenzo the Magnificent. [Century Dictionary]
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Twi (n.)
chief language of Ghana in West Africa; also known as Akan, it is in the Niger-Congo language family.
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