Etymology
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Stuart 
name of the British royal family from 1603 to 1668; see steward. Attested from 1873 as an attribution for styles from that period.
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hafla (n.)
in reference to belly-dance performance and social gathering, by 1998, from Arabic hafla "party, social or family gathering."
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Battenberg (n.)
type of cake, 1903, from name of a town in Germany, the seat of a family which became known in Britain as Mountbatten.
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Stammbaum (n.)
German, "family tree," especially of languages, 1939, from Stamm "tree, trunk" (see stem (n.)) + Baum "tree" (see beam (n.)).
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ox-tongue (n.)

also oxtongue, "plant of the borage family with rough, tongue-shaped leaves," early 14c., oxe-tunge, from ox + tongue (n.).

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Twi (n.)
chief language of Ghana in West Africa; also known as Akan, it is in the Niger-Congo language family.
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housewarming (n.)
also house-warming, "celebration of the entry of a family into a new home," 1570s, from house (n.) + verbal noun from warm (v.).
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Muskogean 

Native American language family of the southeastern U.S., 1890, from Muskogee, name of the Creek and related tribes (1775), from Creek maskoki.

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double-bass (n.)

string instrument, the largest and deepest instrument of the viol family, by 1728; see double (adj.) + bass (n.2).

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gypsophila (n.)
genus of the pink family, 1771, from Modern Latin (Linnaeus), from Greek gypsos "chalk, gypsum" (see gypsum) + philein "to love" (see philo-).
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