Etymology
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gazebo (n.)
1752, supposedly a facetious formation from gaze + -bo, Latin first person singular future tense suffix (as in videbo "I shall see"), on model of earlier belvedere "cupola," from Italian, literally "a fair sight." But according to OED perhaps rather a corruption of some oriental word.
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unfair (adj.)
Old English unfægr "unlovely, not beautiful, deformed, hideous, unlovable," from un- (1) "not" + fair (adj.). Similar formation in Old Norse ufagr, Gothic unfagrs. Meaning "wicked, evil, bad" is recorded from c. 1300. Sense of "not equitable, unjust" is first recorded 1713. Related: Unfairly.
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bona fides (n.)

"good faith, fair dealing, freedom from intent to deceive," by 1838, English pluralization of bona fide, as though the Latin phrase were a noun. Sense of "guarantees of good faith" is by 1944. The opposite is mala fides "bad faith, intent to deceive."

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serene (adj.)

mid-15c., of a day, "clear, fair, calm," from Old French serein and directly from Latin serenus "peaceful, calm, clear, unclouded" (of weather); figuratively "cheerful, glad, tranquil"(from PIE root *ksero- "dry," source also of Greek xeros "dry, arid;" see xerasia).

In English, the word has been applied to persons, characters, etc. since 1630s: "tranquil, unruffled." Related: Serenely. Middle English also had serenous (mid-15c.), of places, "having clear, fair weather."

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Dieu et mon droit 

French, "God and my right," the watchword of Richard I at the Battle of Gisors (1195), adopted as the motto on the royal arms of England. The "right" was Edward's claim to the crown of France upon the death of his uncle, Charles the Fair, king of France, without male issue.

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goodly (adj.)
Old English godlic "excellent; comely fair;" see good (n.) + -ly (1). From c. 1200 as "considerable in size or number." Similar formation in Old Frisian godlik, Old High German guotlih, Old Norse godhligr. Related: Goodliness.
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fairly (adv.)
c. 1400, "handsomely," from fair (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "impartially, justly" is from 1670s. Sense of "somewhat" is from 1805, a curious contrast to the earlier, but still active, sense of "totally" (1590s). Old English had fægerlice "splendidly."
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xanthous (adj.)
1829, "fair-haired and light-complexioned," from Greek xanthos "yellow," of unknown origin (see xantho-). But the word also was used in 19c. anthropology as "specifying the yellow or Mongoloid type of mankind" [Century Dictionary].
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pulchritudinous (adj.)

"beautiful, fine or graceful in any way," 1877, American English, from pulchritude (from Latin pulchritudo "beauty," genitive pulchritudinis) + -ous. Earlier English had now-obsolete pulcrious "beautiful, fair" (c. 1500).

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iso- 
before vowels often is-, word-forming element meaning "equal, similar, identical; isometric," from Greek isos "equal to, the same as; equally divided; fair, impartial (of persons); even, level (of ground)," as in isometor "like one's mother." In English used properly only with words of Greek origin; the Latin equivalent is equi- (see equi-).
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