Etymology
Advertisement
approbate (v.)
"express a liking or satisfaction," late 15c., from Latin approbatus, past participle of approbare "to assent to (as good), favor" (see approve). Related: Approbated; approbating.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pantomime (v.)

1746, "representing only in mute action; 1768, "express by actions, not words," from pantomime (n.). Related: Pantomimed; pantomiming.

Related entries & more 
holophrastic (adj.)
"having the force of a whole phrase; expressive of a complex idea," 1837, from holo- "whole" + Latinized form of Greek phrastikos, from phrazein "to indicate, tell, express" (see phrase (n.)).
Related entries & more 
sh (interj.)
exclamation used to urge or request silence, 1847. The gesture of putting a finger to the lips to express silence is attested from Roman times. As a transitive verb from 1887; intransitive from 1925.
Related entries & more 
verbalize (v.)
c. 1600, "use too many words," from French verbaliser (16c.); see verbal. Meaning "express in words" is attested from 1875. Related: Verbalized; verbalizing.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
alphabetize (v.)
1848, "arrange alphabetically," from alphabet + -ize. The older verb was simply alphabet (1700). From 1854 as "express by alphabetic letters." Related: Alphabetized; alphabetizing.
Related entries & more 
enunciation (n.)
1550s, "a declaration," from Latin enuntiationem (nominative enuntiatio) "enunciation, declaration," noun of action from past participle stem of enuntiare "to speak out, say, express" (see enunciate). Meaning "articulation of words" is from 1750.
Related entries & more 
rhapsodize (v.)

c. 1600, "to piece together (narratives)," a sense now obsolete; 1806, "to talk rhapsodically, express with poetical enthusiasm;" see rhapsody + -ize. Related: Rhapsodized; rhapsodizing.

Related entries & more 
sympathize (v.)

"have fellow-feeling," c. 1600, from French sympathiser, from sympathie (see sympathy). Earlier in a physiological sense (1590s). As "express sympathy," from 1748. Related: Sympathized; sympathizing.

Related entries & more 
pleonastic (adj.)

"characterized by pleonasm, redundant in language, using more words than are necessary to express an idea," 1778, with -ic + Greek pleonastos "abundant," from pleonazein (see pleonasm). Related: Pleonastical (1650s).

Related entries & more 

Page 4