Etymology
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rudiment (n.)

1540s, "element or first principle of a science or art," from French rudiment (16c.) or directly from Latin rudimentum "early training, first experience, beginning, first principle," from rudis "unlearned, untrained" (see rude).

The sense of "anything in an undeveloped state" is by 1560s. Related: Rudiments.

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susceptibility (n.)

"capability of receiving impressions or being influenced," 1640s, from Medieval Latin susceptibilitatem (nominative susceptibilitas), from Late Latin susceptibilis (see susceptible), or else a native formation from susceptible + -ity. From mid-18c. especially "mental sensitiveness, tendency to experience emotions." 

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satispassion (n.)

also satis-passion, 1610s, used by Lancelot Andrewes for "atonement by adequate suffering," from Latin satis pati "to suffer enough," from satis "enough" (from PIE root *sa- "to satisfy") + pati "to endure, undergo, experience," which is of uncertain origin.

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junior (n.)

"a person younger than another; one of less experience or standing," 1520s, from junior (adj.). Generically as a name for a young boy, a young son from 1917, American English. In the U.S. college sense "student in the third year" from 1862.

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usage (n.)

c. 1300, "established practice, custom," from Anglo-French and Old French usage "custom, habit, experience; taxes levied," from us, from Latin usus "use, custom" (see use (v.)). From late 14c. as "service, use, act of using something."

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a priori 

1710, "from cause to effect," a Latin term in logic from c. 1300, in reference to reasoning from antecedent to consequent, based on causes and first principles, literally "from what comes first," from priori, ablative of prior "first" (see prior (adj.)). Opposed to a posteriori. Since c. 1840, based on Kant, used more loosely for "cognitions which, though they may come to us in experience, have their origin in the nature of the mind, and are independent of experience" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Apriorist; apriorism; aprioristic. The a is the usual form of Latin ab "off, of, away from" before consonants (see ab-).

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expressionist (adj.)

1850 in reference to an artist who seeks to portray the emotional experience of the subject, from expression (which was used in the fine arts by 1715 with a sense "way of expressing") + -ist. Modern sense is from 1914, from expressionism (from 1908 as an artistic style or movement). As a noun from 1880. Related: Expressionistic.

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presuppose (v.)

early 15c., altered from presupponen (c. 1400), "assume beforehand or in the beginning," from Old French presupposer (14c.), formed in French or else from Medieval Latin praesupponere; see pre- + suppose. The meaning "take for granted in advance of actual knowledge or experience" is from 1520s. Related: Presupposed; presupposing.

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trauma (n.)

1690s, "physical wound," medical Latin, from Greek trauma "a wound, a hurt; a defeat," from PIE *trau-, extended form of root *tere- (1) "to rub, turn," with derivatives referring to twisting, piercing, etc. Sense of "psychic wound, unpleasant experience which causes abnormal stress" is from 1894.

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relive (v.)

also re-live, 1540s, "to come to life again, revive" (also "to restore to life again, recall to life," a sense now archaic), from re- "back, again" + live (v.). Meaning "to experience (an incident, a period of time) over again" is attested from 1711. Related: Relived; reliving.

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