Etymology
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immoderate (adj.)
"excessive, extreme, lacking moderation," late 14c., from Latin immoderatus "boundless, immeasurable," figuratively "unrestrained, excessive," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + moderatus "within bounds, observing moderation;" figuratively "modest, restrained," past participle of moderari "to regulate, mitigate, restrain, temper, set a measure, keep (something) within measure," from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Related: Immoderately.
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oversell (v.)

also over-sell, 1879, "sell more than one can deliver," from over- + sell (v.). Figurative sense of "make unrealistic or excessive claims for" is by 1928.

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oversexed (adj.)

also over-sexed, "inordinately desirous of sex; having sexual properties or tendencies in an excessive degree," 1898; see over- + sex (n.).

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outrageous (adj.)

c. 1300, "excessive, extravagant, exorbitant, immoderate," from Old French outrageus, outrajos "immoderate, excessive, violent, lawless" (Modern French outrageux), from outrage, oltrage, from Vulgar Latin *ultraticum "excess," from Latin ultra "beyond" (from suffixed form of PIE root *al- "beyond"). Meaning "flagrantly evil, atrocious" is late 14c.; modern teen slang usages of it unwittingly approach the original and etymological sense of outrage. Related: Outrageously; outrageousness.

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pathological (adj.)
1680s, "pertaining to disease," formed in English from pathologic + -al (1). Sense of "worthy to be a subject of pathology, morbid, excessive" (as in pathological liar) is attested from 1845. Related: Pathologically.
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pooh-bah (n.)

"leader who maintains excessive bureaucratic control," 1888, from Pooh Bah, the name of the "Lord High Everything Else" character in Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado" (1885).

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fondly (adj.)
mid-14c., "foolishly," from fond + -ly (2). Formerly sometimes in a bad sense, "with indiscreet or excessive affection" (1762). Meaning "affectionately" is from 1590s.
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hyperaphia (n.)
"excessive sensitivity to touch," 1837, from German hyperaphia (1820s), from Greek aphe "touch;" also see hyper-. Related: hyperaphic "having morbid sensitiveness to touch" (1888).
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polydipsia (n.)

in pathology, "excessive thirst," 1650s, from Greek polydipsios "very thirsty," from polys "much, many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + dipsa "thirst" (a word of unknown origin) + -ia "condition of."

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unmeet (adj.)
Old English unmæte "immoderate, excessive," from un- (1) "not" + meet (adj.). Similar formation in Old High German unmazi. Meanings "unfitting" and "unsuited" (for some purpose) are from 1520s.
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