Etymology
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bicentennial (adj.)
also bi-centennial, "occurring every two-hundred years," 1843, American English; see bi- + centennial (q.v.). In rivalry with bicentenary (1840) which seems to have been the more common word in Britain. From 1871 as a noun, "the two-hundredth anniversary of an event."
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rain-out (n.)

also rain out, rainout, "cancellation or interruption of an outdoor event due to rain," 1947, from the verbal phrase; see rain (v.) + out (adv.). Of baseball games, to be rained out "cancelled because of rain" is attested from 1928.

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time (v.)
Old English getimian "to happen, befall," from time (n.). Meaning "to appoint a time" (of an action, etc.) is attested from c. 1300; sense of "to measure or record the time of" (a race, event, etc.) is first attested 1660s. Related: Timed; timing.
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mishap (n.)

mid-13c., "bad luck, misfortune, unlucky accident," from mis- (1) "bad" + hap (n.) "luck." It probably was formed on analogy of Old French mescheance (see mischance (n.)). Meaning "unfortunate event" is from mid-14c.

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happening (n.)
mid-15c., "chance, luck," verbal noun from happen (v.); meaning "an occurrence" is 1550s. Sense of "spontaneous event or display" is from 1959 in the argot of artists. Happenings "events" was noted by Fowler as a vogue word from c. 1905.
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marathon (n.)

1896, marathon race, from story of Greek hero Pheidippides, who in 490 B.C.E. ran to Athens from the Plains of Marathon to tell of the allied Greek victory there over Persian army. The original story (Herodotus) is that he ran from Athens to Sparta to seek aid, which arrived too late to participate in the battle.

It was introduced as an athletic event in the 1896 revival of the Olympic Games, based on a later, less likely story, that Pheidippides ran to Athens from the battlefield with news of the victory. The word quickly was extended to mean "any very long event or activity." The place name is literally "fennel-field." Related: Marathoner (by 1912); Marathonian.

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ecbatic (adj.)
"drawn from the relationship of cause and effect," especially of arguments, 1836, from ecbasis, from Latin ecbasis, from Greek ekbasis "a going out, issue, event," from ek- "out" (see ex-) + basis "a step, a base," from bainein "to go, walk, step," from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come."
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tune-up (n.)
"adjustments made to an automobile to improve its working," 1911, from verbal phrase tune up "bring to a state of effectiveness," 1718, in reference to musical instruments, from tune (v.) + up (adv.). Attested from 1901 in reference to engines. Meaning "event that serves as practice for a later one" is from 1934, U.S. sports jargon.
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predict (v.)

1620s (implied in predicted), "foretell, prophesy, declare before the event happens," a back formation from prediction or else from Latin praedicatus, past participle of praedicere "foretell, advise, give notice," from prae "before" (see pre-) + dicere "to say" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly"). Related: Predicted; predicting.

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reify (v.)

"make mentally into a thing; make (an abstraction) real or material; consider as a thing," 1854, a back-formation from reification or else from re-, stem of Latin res "thing, object; matter, affair, event; circumstance, condition" (see re) + -fy. Related: Reified; reifying.

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