Etymology
Advertisement
rubber (n.2)

"deciding match" in a game or contest, usually a third where each has won one, 1590s, a word of unknown origin and signification; even the original form is uncertain. Not obviously connected to rubber (n.1). 

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
equiparation (n.)
mid-15c., "impartial treatment;" 1610s, "equal ranking;" from Latin aequiparationem (nominative aequiparatio) "an equalizing, comparison," from past participle stem of aequiparare "put on equality, compare," from aequipar "equal, alike," from aequus "equal, even" (see equal (adj.)) + par (see par (n.)). Related: Equiparate.
Related entries & more 
equal (adj.)
late 14c., "identical in amount, extent, or portion;" early 15c., "even or smooth of surface," from Latin aequalis "uniform, identical, equal," from aequus "level, even, flat; as tall as, on a level with; friendly, kind, just, fair, equitable, impartial; proportionate; calm, tranquil," which is of unknown origin. Parallel formation egal (from Old French egal) was in use late 14c.-17c. Equal rights is from 1752; by 1854 in American English in reference to men and women. Equal opportunity (adj.) in terms of hiring, etc. is recorded by 1925.
Related entries & more 
pianissimo (adv.)

musical instruction, "with the minimum of force or loudness," 1724, from Italian pianissimo "very softly," superlative of piano, which is ultimately is from Latin planus "flat, smooth, even," later "soft" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread").

Related entries & more 
alright 

frequent spelling of all right, attested in print by 1884.

There are no such forms as all-right, or allright, or alright, though even the last, if seldom allowed by the compositors to appear in print, is often seen ... in MS. [Fowler]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
aroint (v.)
intransitive verb, c. 1600, used by Shakespeare (only in imperative, aroint thee! "begone!"), obsolete and of obscure origin. "[T]he subject of numerous conjectures, none of which can be said to have even a prima facie probability." [OED]
Related entries & more 
Planaria (n.)

flat worm-like animal, 1819, from Modern Latin (1776) noun use of fem. of Late Latin planarius, literally "on level ground" (here used to mean "flat"), from Latin planum, planus "flat, level, even, plain" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread"). Related: Planarian.

Related entries & more 
anomalous (adj.)

"deviating from a general rule," 1640s, from Late Latin anomalus, from Greek anomalos "uneven, irregular," from an- "not" (see an- (1)) + homalos "even," from homos "same" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with"). Related: Anomalously; anomalousness.

Related entries & more 
inequitable (adj.)
"unfair, unjust," 1660s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + equitable, which is ultimately from Latin aequus "even, just, equal." Related: Inequitably. The same formation in English has also meant "impassable on horses, unfit for riding over" (1620s), from Latin inequabilis, from equus "a horse" (see equine).
Related entries & more 
e-mail 

1982, short for electronic mail (1977; see electronic + mail (n.1)); this led to the contemptuous application of snail mail (1983) to the old system.

Even aerial navigation in 1999 was found too slow to convey and deliver the mails. The pneumatic tube system was even swifter, and with such facilities at hand it is not surprising that people in San Francisco received four daily editions of the Manhattan journals, although the distance between Sandy Hook and the Golden Gate is a matter of 3,600 miles. ["Looking Forward," Arthur Bird, 1899]

Associated Press style guide collapsed it to email 2011.

Related entries & more 

Page 4