Etymology
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fig (n.2)

"dress, equipment," 1823, in phrase in full fig; hence "condition, state of preparedness" (1883). Said to be an abbreviation of figure (n.), perhaps from the abbreviation of that word in plate illustrations in books, etc. According to others, from the fig leaves of Adam and Eve. Related: Figgery.

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exuviae (n.)

"cast-off skins, shells, or other coverings of animals," 1650s, Latin, literally "that which is stripped off," hence "slough, skin," also "clothing, equipment, arms, booty, spoils," from stem of exuere "to doff," from ex "off" (see ex-) + from PIE root *eu- "to dress" (also found in Latin induere "to dress," reduvia "fragment").

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armature (n.)

c. 1400, "an armed force," from Latin armatura "armor, equipment," from armatus, past participle of armare "to arm, furnish with weapons" from arma "weapons," literally "tools, implements (of war);" see arm (n.2). The meaning "armor" is mid-15c.; that of "protective covering of a plant or animal" is from 1660s. The electromagnetic sense is from 1835.

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coe (n.)

"hut built by miners over a mine shaft," to store their equipment, etc., 1650s, from some source akin to Dutch kouw, German kaue in the same sense, from West Germanic *kauja-, an early borrowing of Latin cavea "hollow," from cavus "a hollow" (from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole").

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procurement (n.)

c. 1300, procuren, "use of improper influence," from Old French procurement "management, stewardship" (13c.), from procurer (see procure) and directly from Medieval Latin procuramentum. Meaning "process of bringing something about" (by the action of another) is from c. 1400. Military meaning "action or process of obtaining equipment and supplies" is by 1949, American English.

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Mace (n.3)

chemical spray originally used in riot control, 1966, technically Chemical Mace, a proprietary name (General Ordnance Equipment Corp, Pittsburgh, Pa.), probably so called for its use as a weapon, in reference to mace (n.1). The verb, "to spray with Mace,"  is attested by 1968. Related: Maced; macing.

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pioneer (n.)

1520s, "one of a party or company of foot soldiers furnished with digging and cutting equipment who prepare the way for the army," from French pionnier "foot-soldier, military pioneer," from Old French paonier "foot-soldier" (11c.), extended form of peon (see pawn (n.2)). Figurative sense of "a first or early explorer, person who goes first or does something first" is from c. 1600. Related: Pioneers.

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dismantle (v.)

1570s, "deprive or strip of fortifications or equipment, raze, destroy, tear down," from French desmanteler "to tear down the walls of a fortress," literally "strip of a cloak," from des- "off, away" (see dis-) + manteler "to cloak," from mantel "cloak" (see mantle (n.)). The literal sense, "deprive of dress, strip" (c. 1600) is archaic or obsolete in English. Related: Dismantled; dismantling.

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array (n.)

mid-14c., "order or position of things, arrangement, sequence," from Anglo-French arrai, Old French aroi, arroi (12c.), from areer "to put in order" (see array (v.)). From late 14c. as "rank or line of soldiers; troops drawn up in battle formation," also "equipment, furnishings, gear; splendid furnishings, grandeur, magnificence." The meaning "an orderly assemblage" is from 1814.

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*ser- (1)

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to protect." It forms all or part of: conservation; conservative; conserve; observance; observatory; observe; preserve; reservation; reserve; reservoir.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Avestan haurvaiti "to guard;" Latin servare "to guard, keep, watch;" Old Church Slavonic xraniti "to guard, protect;" Old High German gi-sarwi "armor, equipment," Old English searu "art, skill; wile, deceit."

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