Etymology
Advertisement
environ (v.)
late 14c. (implied in environing), "to surround, encircle, encompass," from Old French environer "to surround, enclose, encircle," from environ "round about," from en- "in" (see en- (1)) + viron "a circle, circuit," also used as an adverb, from virer "to turn" (see veer). Related: Environed.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hem (v.)
late 14c., "to provide (something) with a border or fringe" (surname Hemmer attested from c. 1300), from hem (n.). Meaning "to enclose, circumscribe" is from 1530s. Related: Hemmed; hemming. The phrase hem in "shut in, confine," first recorded 1530s.
Related entries & more 
determinative (adj.)

"having power or tendency to fix or decide," 1650s, from French déterminatif (15c.), from Latin determinat-, past-participle stem of determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to" (see determine). Meaning "serving to determine the precise kind of a thing" is from 1690s. As a noun, "that which determines," from 1832.

Related entries & more 
wall (v.)
"to enclose with a wall," late Old English *weallian (implied in geweallod), from the source of wall (n.). Meaning "fill up (a doorway, etc.) with a wall" is from c. 1500. Meaning "shut up in a wall, immure" is from 1520s. Related: Walled; walling.
Related entries & more 
Asgard (n.)

in Norse religion, the home of the gods and goddesses and of heroes slain in battle, from Old Norse āss "god," which is related to Old English os, Gothic ans "god" (see Aesir) + Old Norse garðr "enclosure, yard, garden" (from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
confine (v.)

1520s, "to border on, have a common boundary," a sense now obsolete, from French confiner "to border; to shut up, enclose," which is perhaps from the noun confins (see confines) or from Medieval Latin confinare "border on; set bounds." Sense of "restrict within bounds, keep within limits" is from 1590s. Related: Confined; confining.

Related entries & more 
determinant 

c. 1600 (adj.), "serving to determine;" 1680s (n.), "that which fixes, defines, or establishes (something);" from Latin determinantem (nominative determinans), present participle of determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to," from de "off" (see de-) + terminare "to mark the end or boundary," from terminus "end, limit" (see terminus).

Related entries & more 
arcane (adj.)
1540s, from Latin arcanus "secret, hidden, private, concealed," from arcere "to close up, enclose, contain," from arca "chest, box, place for safe-keeping," from PIE root *ark- "to hold, contain, guard" (source also of Greek arkos "defense," arkein "to ward off;" Armenian argel "obstacle;" Lithuanian raktas "key," rakinti "to shut, lock").
Related entries & more 
impasto (n.)
"laying on of colors thickly and boldly," 1784, from Italian impasto, noun of action from impastare "to raise paste; to put in paste," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + pasta "paste" (see pasta). Nativized form impaste is attested from 1540s as "enclose in paste," 1727 in reference to painting. Related: Impastoed; impastation.
Related entries & more 
contents (n.)

"things contained, that which is contained" in something (the stomach, a document, etc.), early 15c., from Latin contentum (plural contenta), noun use of neuter past participle in the literal sense of continere "to hold together, enclose," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch"). Table of contents is from late 15c.

Related entries & more 

Page 4