Etymology
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booster (n.)

1885, "one who boosts" or promotes something, agent noun from boost (v.). The electrical sense is recorded from 1894. Young child's booster chair is attested under that name from 1957 (booster-seat is from 1956). Related: Boosterism (1902).

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ohm (n.)

unit of electrical resistance, 1867, in recognition of German physicist Georg S. Ohm (1789-1854), who determined the law of the flow of electricity. Originally proposed as ohma (1861) as a unit of voltage. Related: ohmage; ohmic; ohmeter.

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adapter (n.)

1801, "one who adapts (something to something else)," agent noun from adapt. From 1808 as "mechanical means of adapting objects so they fit or work together" (originally of chemistry apparatus); electrical engineering sense is by 1907.

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oscilloscope (n.)

"instrument for visually recording an electrical wave," by 1907, a hybrid formed from Latin oscillare "to swing" (see oscillation) + -scope. In reference to the modern cathode-ray oscilloscope, by 1927.

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potentiometer (n.)

"instrument for measuring the difference of electrical potential between two points," 1868, a hybrid formed from combining form of Latin potentia "power" (see potential) + Greek-derived -meter. Related: Potentiometric.

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wire (v.)

c. 1300, "adorn with (gold) wire," from wire (n.). From 1859 as "communicate by means of a telegraphic wire;" 1891 as "furnish with electrical wires and connections." Related: Wired; wiring.

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klaxon (n.)

"loud warning horn," 1908, originally on automobiles, said to have been named for the company that sold them (The Klaxon Company; distributor for Lovell-McConnell Manufacturing Co., Newark, New Jersey), but probably the company was named for the horn, from a made-up word likely based on Greek klazein "to roar," which is cognate with Latin clangere "to resound" (compare clang).

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subway (n.)

1825, "underground passage" (for water pipes or pedestrians, later for electrical wires), from sub- + way (n.). The sense of "underground railway in a city" is first recorded 1892, in reference to London.

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toaster (n.)

1580s, agent noun from toast (v.1). Electrical type is from 1913. In reference to a person who proposes or pledges a drinking toast, from 1704 (from toast (v.2)). Toaster-oven attested from 1957.

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