Etymology
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pre-electric (adj.)

"occurring or pertaining to the time before the use of electricity," 1879, from pre- + electric.

Just as her father was thus summoned away, Lotty saw Fred in the distance, waving his arms, and looking like an animated semaphore of the pre-electric epoch. [Arthur Locker, "Tollit's Tragedy," in The Graphic, summer 1879]
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electrode (n.)

"one of the two ends of an open electrical circuit," 1834, coined by English physicist and chemist Michael Faraday from electro- + Greek hodos "a way, path, track, road" (a word of uncertain origin; see Exodus) on the same pattern as anode, cathode.

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elector (n.)

"one who elects or has the right of choice," mid-15c., from Latin elector "chooser, selecter," agent noun from past-participle stem of eligere "to pick out, choose" (see election).

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electrify (v.)
1745, "to charge with electricity, cause electricity to pass through;" see electric + -fy. Figurative sense recorded by 1752. Meaning "convert a factory, industry, etc., to electrical power" is by 1902. Related: Electrified; electrifying.
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electroencephalogram (n.)
1934, from electro- + encephalo-, combining form of Modern Latin encephalon "brain" (see encephalitis) + -gram.
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electorate (n.)
1670s, "condition of being an elector," in reference to Germany, from elector + -ate (1). Meaning "whole body of voters" is from 1879.
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electromagnet (n.)
also electro-magnet, "magnet which owes its magnetic properties to electric current," 1822; see electro- + magnet.
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electromagnetism (n.)

also electro-magnetism, "the collective term for phenomena which rest upon the relation between electric currents and magnetism," 1821; see electro- + magnetism.

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election (n.)

c. 1300, eleccioun, "act of choosing" someone to occupy a position, elevation to office" (whether by one person or a body of electors); also "the holding of a vote by a body of electors by established procedure; the time and place of such a vote," from Anglo-French eleccioun, Old French elecion "choice, election, selection" (12c.), from Latin electionem (nominative electio) "a choice, selection," noun of action from past-participle stem of eligere "pick out, select," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -ligere, combining form of legere "to choose," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather."

In Middle English also "act of choosing" generally, "choice, free choice" (c. 1400). The theological sense of "God's choice of someone" for eternal life is from late 14c. Meaning "act of choosing, choice" is from c. 1400.

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