Etymology
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frass (n.)
insect excrement, 1854, from German frasz, from root of fressen "to devour, to eat as a beast does" (see fret (v.)).
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gateau (n.)
1845, from French gâteau "cake," from Old French gastel, from Frankish *wastil "cake," from Proto-Germanic *was-tilaz, from PIE *wes- (5) "to eat, consume."
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aphagia (n.)
"inability to swallow," 1854, from a- (3) "not, without" + abstract noun from Greek phagein "to eat" (from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share").
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ort (n.)

"remains of food left from a meal, a table scrap," mid-15c. (from c. 1300 in Anglo-Latin), originally of animal food, but not common until late 16c.;  probably cognate with early Dutch ooraete, Low German ort, from or-, privative prefix, + etan "to eat" (from PIE root *ed- "to eat"). Perhaps from an unrecorded Old English word.

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dine (v.)

c. 1300, dinen, "eat the chief meal of the day, take dinner;" also in a general sense "to eat," from Old French disner  "to dine, eat, have a meal" (Modern French dîner), originally "take the first meal of the day," from stem of Gallo-Roman *desjunare "to break one's fast," from Vulgar Latin *disjejunare, from dis- "undo, do the opposite of" (see dis-) + Late Latin jejunare "to fast," from Latin iejunus "fasting, hungry, not partaking of food" (see jejune).

Transitive sense of "give a dinner to" is from late 14c. To dine out "take dinner away from home" is by 1758.

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lunch-counter (n.)

"long, elevated table where customers eat standing or sitting on high stools," 1854, American English; see lunch (n.) + counter (n.).

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-phage 
word-forming element meaning "eater," from stem of Greek phagein "to eat," from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share."
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devour (v.)

early 14c., devouren, of beasts or persons, "to eat up entirely, eat ravenously, consume as food," from Old French devorer (12c.) "devour, swallow up, engulf," from Latin devorare "swallow down, accept eagerly," from de "down" (see de-) + vorare "to swallow" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring"). Of persons or inanimate agents (fire, pestilence, etc.) "consume destructively or wastefully," late 14c. To "swallow up" figuratively (a book, etc.) from 1580s; to "take in ravenously" with the eyes, 1620s. Related: Devoured; devouring.

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peckish (adj.)

"somewhat hungry, inclined to eat," literally "disposed to peck," 1785, from peck (v.) + -ish. Also compare peck (n.2). Related: Peckishly; peckishness.

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macaw (n.)

species of large, long-tailed American parrots, 1660s, from Portuguese macau, from a word in a Brazilian language, perhaps Tupi macavuana, which may be the name of a type of palm tree the fruit of which the birds eat.

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