Etymology
Advertisement
severally (adv.)

late 14c., severalli, "separately, each in turn, individually," from several + -ly (2). From early 15c. as "more than once, several times." By 1520s as "apart from others or the rest."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
duplicate (n.)

1530s, "one of two or more things corresponding in every respect to each other," from duplicate (adj.). From 1701 as "another corresponding to a first or original, an exact counterpart or double of an original."

Related entries & more 
rubber (n.2)

"deciding match" in a game or contest, usually a third where each has won one, 1590s, a word of unknown origin and signification; even the original form is uncertain. Not obviously connected to rubber (n.1). 

Related entries & more 
clearing-house (n.)

also clearinghouse, 1805, from clearing + house (n.). The original was established 1775 in London by the bankers for the adjustment of their mutual claims for checks and bills; later the word was extended to similar institutions.

CLEARING, is a method adopted by city bankers, for exchanging the drafts on each others houses, and settling the differences.—Thus at a stated hour in the afternoon, a clerk from each attends at the Clearing House, where he brings all the drafts on the other bankers, which have been paid into his house during the course of the day; and, having debited their different accounts with the articles which he has against them, he deposits them in their proper drawers, (a drawer being here allotted to each banker:) he then credits their accounts respectively, with the articles which they have against him, as found in his drawer. Balances are then struck on all the accounts, and the differences are transferred from one to another, until they are so wound up, that each clerk has only to settle with two or three others, which is done in cash, or Bank of England notes. [P. Kelly, "The Elements of Book-Keeping," London, 1805]
Related entries & more 
are (n.)
metric unit of square measure, 10 meters on each side (100 square meters), 1819, from French, formed 1795 by decree of the French National Convention, from Latin area "vacant piece of ground" (see area).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
percentile (n.)

in statistics, "each of a series of values obtained by dividing a large number of quantities into 100 equal groups in order of magnitude," 1885, coined by English scientist Francis Galton (1822-1911) from percent + -ile.

Related entries & more 
everything (n.)

"all things, taken separately; any total or aggregate considered with reference to its constituent parts; each separate item or particular," late 14c., from every + thing. Colloquially, "something of extreme importance," by 1889.

Related entries & more 
probabilism (n.)

1719, in Catholic theology, the doctrine that when there are two probable opinions, each apparently resting on reason, it is lawful to follow the probable opinion which favors one's inclination; from French, from Latin probabilis (see probable) + -ism.

Related entries & more 
per diem 

1510s, "by the day, in each day," Latin, "by the day," from per (see per) + diem, accusative singular of dies "day" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine"). As a noun from 1809, "amount or allowance of so much every day."

Related entries & more 
millenary (adj.)

"consisting of or containing a thousand," 1570s, from Late Latin millenarius "containing a thousand," from millenia "a thousand each," from Latin mille "thousand" (see million). As a noun, 1560s as "a believer in the (Christian) millennium;" by 1897 as "thousandth anniversary."

Related entries & more 

Page 4