Etymology
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coign (n.)

also coigne, an archaic spelling of quoin (q.v.) the survival of which is due to Shakespeare's coign of vantage ("Macbeth" I.vi.), popularized by Sir Walter Scott; in this phrase it is properly "a projecting corner" (for observation).

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presbycousis (n.)

"loss of hearing acuteness due to age," 1890, medical Latin (by 1886 in German), from Greek presbys "old man; elderly, aged" (see presby-) + akousis "hearing," from akouein "to hear" (see acoustic).

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rain-out (n.)

also rain out, rainout, "cancellation or interruption of an outdoor event due to rain," 1947, from the verbal phrase; see rain (v.) + out (adv.). Of baseball games, to be rained out "cancelled because of rain" is attested from 1928.

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belated (adj.)
1610s, "overtaken by night" from staying too late or being delayed, past-participle adjective from belate "to make late, detain," from be- + late. Sense of "coming past due, behind date" is from 1660s. Related: Belatedly; belatedness.
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payment (n.)

late 14c., paiement, "action of paying, repayment of a debt; amount due as a payment," from Old French paiement (13c.), from paiier (see pay (v.)). Meaning "thing or sum of money given in discharge of a debt" is from mid-15c.

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tempera (n.)
also tempra, 1832, from Italian tempera (in phrase pingere a tempera), back-formation from temperare "to mix (colors); temper," from Latin temperare "to mix in due proportion, modify, blend; restrain oneself" (see temper (v.)).
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resistless (adj.)

1580s, "irresistible, incapable of being withstood;" 1590s, "unresisting, powerless to resist," from resist (v.) + -less. Related: Resistlessly; resistlessness. Now apparently obsolete in both senses, probably at least in part due to the somewhat conflicting sense.

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willful (adj.)
also wilful, c. 1200, "strong-willed," usually in a bad sense, "obstinate, unreasonable," from will (n.) + -ful. From late 14c. as "eager" (to do something). Mid-14c., of actions, "done on purpose, intentional, due to one's own will." Related: Willfullness.
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creditor (n.)

mid-15c., "one to whom any return is due or payable, one to whom money is owed," from Anglo-French creditour, Old French creditor (early 14c.), from Latin creditor "truster; lender," from creditus, past participle of credere "to believe" (see credo).

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balance (v.)
1570s, "be equal with," from balance (n.). Meaning "serve as a counterpoise to" is from 1590s; that of "bring or keep in equilibrium" is from 1630s; that of "keep oneself in equilibrium" is from 1833. Of accounts, "settle by paying what remains due," from 1580s. Related: Balanced; balancing.
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