Etymology
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alyssum (n.)

type of European flowering plant, 1550s, from Latin alysson, from Greek alysson, which is perhaps the neuter of adjective alyssos "curing madness," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + lyssa "madness, martial rage, fury," an abstract word probably literally "wolf-ness" and related to lykos "wolf" (see wolf (n.)); but some see a connection with "light" words, in reference to the glittering eyes of the mad.

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bar (n.3)

"whole body of lawyers, the legal profession," 1550s, a sense which derives ultimately from the railing that separated benchers from the hall in the Inns of Court (see bar (n.1)). Students who had attained a certain standing were "called" to it to take part in the important exercises of the house. After c. 1600, however, this was popularly assumed to mean the bar in a courtroom, the wooden railing marking off the area around the judge's seat, where prisoners stood for arraignment and where a barrister (q.v.) stood to plead. As the place where the business of court was done, bar in this sense had become synonymous with court by early 14c.

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in forma pauperis 

legal Latin, literally "in the form of a poor person" (thus exempt from certain court fees, etc.), 1590s; see form (n.) + pauper (n.).

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Cortes (n.)

1660s, "national legislative assembly of Spain; parliament or legislature of Portugal," from Spanish and Portuguese plural of corte, from Latin cortem (see court (n.)).

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split (adj.)

1640s, past-participle adjective from split (v.). Split decision is from 1946 of court rulings, 1951 in boxing. Split shift is from 1904. Split personality first attested 1899.

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alleged (adj.)

mid-15c., "quoted," past-participle adjective from allege. Attested from 1610s in sense of "brought forth in court;" 1670s as "asserted but not proved."

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dies non (n.)

legal Latin phrase meaning "day in which courts are not held" (Sunday, etc.), short for dies non juridicus "not a court day."

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cognizable (adj.)

1670s, "capable of being known," also "liable to be tried in a given court or jurisdiction," from stem of cognizance (q.v.) + -able. Related: Cognizably; cognizability.

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hearing (n.)

early 13c., "perception of sound by ear, action of listening," verbal noun from hear (v.). Meaning "a listening to evidence in a court of law" is from 1570s. Hearing-aid is from 1908.

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Areopagite (n.)

"member of the Areopagus court," late 14c. (Acts xvii.34); see Areopagus + -ite (1). Related: Areopagitic; Areopagitical.

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