Etymology
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dishabille (n.)

"undress or negligent dress," especially "a loose morning dress," 1670s, from French déshabillé (17c.), noun use of past participle of déshabiller "to undress" (oneself), from des- (see dis-) + habiller "to dress," originally "prepare, arrange," from Latin habitus "condition, demeanor, appearance, dress," originally past participle of habere "to have, hold, possess; wear; find oneself, be situated; consider, think, reason, have in mind; manage, keep," from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive."

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Smokey Bear (n.)
"state policeman," 1974, from truckers' slang, in reference to the wide-brim style of hat worn by state troopers (the hats so called by 1969). Ultimately the reference is to a popular illustrated character of that name, dressed in forest ranger gear (including a hat like those later worn by state troopers). He was introduced in 1944 by the U.S. Forest Service and the Wartime Advertising Council in a campaign to lower the number of forest fires in the West.
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boater (n.)
"stiff, flat straw hat," 1896, from boat (n.). So called for being suitable to wear while boating.
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sombrero (n.)
1770, from Spanish sombrero "broad-brimmed hat," originally "umbrella, parasol" (a sense found in English 1590s), from sombra "shade," from Late Latin subumbrare (see somber).
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attire (v.)
c. 1300, atiren, "to fit out, equip; to dress in finery, to adorn," from Old French atirer, earlier atirier "to equip, ready, prepare," from a- "to" (see ad-) + tire "order, row, dress" (see tier). Related: Attired; attiring.
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pinafore (n.)

1782, "sleeveless apron worn by children," originally to protect the front of the dress, from pin (v.) + afore "on the front." So called because it was originally pinned to a dress front. Later a fashion garment for women (c. 1900).

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Stetson 
1902, trademark name, from John B. Stetson (1830-1906), U.S. hat manufacturer, who started his company in Philadelphia in 1865.
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gabardine (n.)
1590s, "dress, covering," variant of gaberdine. Meaning "closely woven cloth" is from 1904.
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bread (v.)
"to dress with bread crumbs," 1620s, from bread (n.). Related: Breaded; breading.
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