Etymology
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downspout (n.)

"pipe conveying rainwater from a roof to the ground or a drain," by 1829, from down (adv.) + spout (n.).

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washdown (n.)
also wash-down, 1949, from verbal phrase, from wash (v.) + down (adv.).
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downtime (n.)

also down-time, 1952, "time when a machine or vehicle is out of service or otherwise unavailable;" from down (adj.) + time (n.). Of persons, "opportunity for rest and relaxation," by 1982.

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slowdown (n.)
also slow-down, 1892, "act of going more slowly," from verbal phrase; see slow (v.) + down (adv.).
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shutdown (n.)
also shut-down, 1884, of factories, etc.; 1911 of machines; from shut (v.) + down (adv.).
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downgrade (v.)

also down-grade, "to lower in rank, status, etc.," 1930, from down (adv.) + grade (v.). Related: Downgraded; downgrading. As a noun, "a downward slope," from 1858.

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downtrodden (adj.)

1560s, "stepped on, trampled upon," from down (adv.) + past participle of tread (v.). Figurative sense of "oppressed, tyrannized" is from 1590s. To tread down in the sense of "overcome, destroy" is from late 12c. 

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beatdown (n.)
"a thorough beating, a thrashing," by 1997 in urban slang, from verbal phrase (attested from c. 1400); see beat (v.) + down (adv.).
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download (v.)

"action or process of transferring from the storage of a larger system to that of a smaller one," 1977, from down (adv.) + load (v.). Related: Downloaded; downloading.

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hands down (adv.)

to win something hands down (1855) is from horse racing, from a jockey's gesture of letting the reins go loose in an easy victory.

The Two Thousand Guinea Stakes was not the best contested one that it has been our fortune to assist at. ... [T]hey were won by Meteor, with Scott for his rider; who went by the post with his hands down, the easiest of all easy half-lengths. Wiseacre certainly did the best in his power to spoil his position, and Misdeal was at one time a little vexatious. [The Sportsman, report from April 26, 1840]

Ancient Greek had akoniti "without a struggle, easily," from akonitos (adj.), literally "without dust," specifically "without the dust of the arena."

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