Etymology
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sully (v.)

1590s, probably from French souiller "to soil," also figurative, from Old French soillier "make dirty" (see soil (v.)). Related: Sullied (1570s); sullying.

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smudgy (adj.)

1859, "dirty, stained, or blackened," from smudge (n.) + -y (2). The meaning "blurry, indistinct" is by 1865. Related: Smudginess.


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squalor (n.)

1620s, "state or condition of being miserable and dirty," from Latin squalor "roughness, dirtiness, filthiness," from squalere "be filthy" (see squalid).

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greasy (adj.)

1510s, from grease (n.) + -y (2). Related: Greasily; greasiness. Greasy spoon "small, cheap restaurant; dirty boarding-house" is from 1906.

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unclean (adj.)

Old English unclæne, "morally impure, defiled, unfit for food," from un- (1) "not" + clean (adj.). Literal sense of "dirty" is recorded from mid-13c.

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undefiled (adj.)

c. 1300, undefylde, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of defile (v.). Originally of morals; sexual sense is attested from mid-15c. Physical sense of "not made dirty" is from 1580s.

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taint 

also 'taint, representing a colloquial contraction of it ain't, by 1830s, American English. The joke about the perineum involving this word dates to at least 1977.

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comedienne (n.)

1849, "actress who plays comedy," from French comédienne, fem. of comédien (see comedian). From 1945 as "professional female joke-teller."

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soil (v.)

early 13c., "to defile or pollute with sin," from Old French soillier "to splatter with mud, to foul or make dirty," originally "to wallow" (12c., Modern French souillier), from souil "tub, wild boar's wallow, pigsty," which is from either Latin solium "tub for bathing; seat" (from PIE *sodio- "seat," from root *sed- "to sit") or Latin suculus "little pig," from sus "pig." Literal meaning "to make dirty, begrime" is attested from c. 1300 in English. Related: Soiled; soiling.

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allusive (adj.)

"involving allusions," c. 1600, from Latin allus-, past-participle stem of alludere "to joke, jest" (see allude) + -ive. Related: Allusively; allusiveness.

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