Etymology
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DOS 

"computer operating system using a disk storage device," 1967, acronym of disk operating system.

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fuse (n.)

"combustible cord or tube for lighting an explosive device," also fuze, 1640s, from Italian fuso, literally "spindle" (the ignition device so called for its shape, because the originals were long, thin tubes filled with gunpowder), from Latin fusus "a spindle," which is of uncertain origin. Influenced by French cognate fusée "spindleful of hemp fiber," and obsolete English fusee "musket fired by a fuse," which is from French. Meaning "device that breaks an electrical circuit" is first recorded 1884, so named for its shape, but erroneously attributed to fuse (v.) because it melts.

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contraption (n.)

a slighting word for "a device, a contrivance," 1825, western England dialect, origin obscure, perhaps from con(trive) + trap, or deception.

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sandbox (n.)

also sand-box, 1570s as a perforated device to sprinkle sand, from sand (n.) + box (n.1). From 1680s as "a box holding sand." In U.S. locomotives, "a device to put sand on the rails when wet wheels slip" (by 1849). By 1891 as a low-sided sand-pit for children's play.

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vernier (n.)

device for making precise measurements, 1766, from name of inventor, French mathematician Pierre Vernier (1580-1637), who described it in 1631.

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compactor (n.)

1590s, "one who puts together," agent noun from compact (v.1). From 1947 as "device for compacting."

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dehumidifier (n.)

"device for removing humidity from the air," 1909, agent noun from dehumidify (1908); see de- + humidify.

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latch (n.)

"device for catching and retaining," especially "a fastening for a door," late 13c., probably from latch (v.).

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transformer (n.)

c. 1600, "one who or that which transforms," agent noun from transform (v.). Meaning "device to reduce electrical currents" is from 1882.

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backscratcher (n.)

also back-scratcher, "rod or other device for scratching one's own back," 1834; see back (n.) + scratch (v.).

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