Etymology
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denial (n.)

1520s, "refusal to grant what is requested or desired;" see deny + -al (2). Replaced earlier denyance (late 15c.). Sense of "act of asserting to the contrary, contradicting" is from 1570s; that of "refusal to accept or acknowledge" is from 1580s. In some 19c. uses, it really means "self-denial." Meaning "unconscious suppression of painful or embarrassing feelings" first attested 1914 in A.A. Brill's translation of Freud's "Psychopathology of Everyday Life"; hence the phrase in denial, popularized 1980s.

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denim (n.)

1690s, from French serge de Nîmes "serge from Nîmes," town in southern France. Originally a kind of serge; application to "coarse, colored, twilled cotton cloth" is by 1850 in American English. Denims "pants made of denim" is recorded from 1868; originally typically overalls. The place name is Roman Nemausus, said to be ultimately from Gaulish nemo "sanctuary."

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denote (v.)

1590s, "mark off from others; identify by a mark; be the sign or symptom of," from French dénoter (14c.), from Latin denotare "denote, mark out," from de- "completely" (see de-) + notare "to mark, note, make a note" (see note (v.)). Related: Denoted; denoting.

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dental (adj.)

1590s, "of or pertaining to teeth," from French dental "of teeth" or Medieval Latin dentalis, from Latin dens (genitive dentis) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth"). As "connected with or used in dentistry," 1826. In grammar, "formed or pronounced at or near the front upper teeth, with the tip or front of the tongue," 1590s. As a noun, "sound formed by placing the end of the tongue against or near the upper teeth," 1794. Related: Dentally; dentality.

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denunciation (n.)

early 15c., denunciacioun, "act of declaring or stating something" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin denunciacionem / denuntiationem (nominative denuntiatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of denuntiare "to announce, proclaim; denounce, menace; command, order," from de "down" (see de-) + nuntiare "proclaim, announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout"). Meaning "a charge, a solemn or formal declaration accompanied by a menace" is mid-15c.

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dentate (adj.)

"toothed, having tooth-like projections, notched," 1770, from Latin dentatus "toothed, having teeth," from dens (genitive dentis) "tooth," from PIE root *dent- "tooth." Related: Dentation (1802).

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dentiloquy (n.)

"act or practice of speaking through the teeth or with the teeth closed," 1737, from Latin dens (genitive dentis) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth") + -loquy, from Latin loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Related: Dentiloquist.

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self-denial (n.)

"act of denying one's own wishes; refusal to satisfy one's own desires," 1640s, from self- + denial.

Self-denial is to be presumed wise, necessary, or benevolent, unless indication is given to the contrary ; it may be the denial of selfishness; it may be not only the refusal to take what one might have, but the voluntary surrender of what one has ; it may be an act, a habit, or a principle. [Century Dictionary]

Related: Self-denier; self-denying (adj.) is by 1630s as "involving self-denial," also "characterized by or involving denial of one's self."

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denouement (n.)

"the solution of a mystery, the winding up of a plot, the outcome of a course of conduct," 1752, from French dénouement "an untying" (of plot), from dénouer "untie" (Old French desnouer) from des- "un-, out" (see dis-) + nouer "to tie, knot," from Latin nodus "a knot," from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie."

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denounce (v.)

early 14c., "announce, make known in a formal manner" (a sense now obsolete), from Old French denoncier (12c., Modern French dénoncer) and directly from Latin denuntiare "to announce, proclaim; denounce, menace; command, order," from de- "down" + nuntiare "proclaim, announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout").

The negative sense in English developed (probably encouraged by other words in de-) via the meanings "proclaim as cursed, excommunicated, removed from office" (early 14c.); "formally or publicly threaten to do" (1630s); "declare or proclaim to be cursed, wicked, or evil" (1660s). The meaning "make formal or public accusation against, inform against, accuse" (especially in turning on one's co-conspirators) is from late 15c. Related: Denounced; denouncing.

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