Etymology
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bait (n.)
"food put on a hook or trap to attract prey," c. 1300, from Old Norse beita "food, bait," especially for fish, from beita "cause to bite," from Proto-Germanic *baitjan, causative of *bitan, from PIE root *bheid- "to split," with derivatives in Germanic referring to biting. The noun is cognate with Old Norse beit "pasture, pasturage," Old English bat "food." Figurative sense "means of enticement" is from c. 1400.
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penetrate (v.)

1520s, "to pierce into or through," from Latin penetratus, past participle of penetrare "to put or get into, enter into; cause to go into." This is related to penitus "within, inmost, interior," penetralis "penetrating; innermost;" penus "innermost part of a temple, store of food," penarius "used for storing food;" Penates "household gods."

All are from penus/penoris "food, provisions," from Proto-Italic *penos, from PIE *penos "food" (source also of Lithuanian penėti "to feed"). De Vann writes that "The semantic appurtenance to 'feed' is explained by Stüber as 'what one feeds with' ('food') > 'the place one feeds at' > 'interior, home'."

The figurative senses of "enter and affect deeply, influence, impress" and "gain intellectual or spiritual access" are from 1580s. Related: Penetrated; penetrating.

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omnivorous (adj.)

"eating food of every kind indiscriminately," 1650s, from Latin omnivorus "all-devouring," from omnis "all" (see omni-) + vorare "devour, swallow" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring"). Figurative use by 1791. Related: Omnivorously; omnivorousness.

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pamper (v.)

late 14c., pamperen, "to cram with food, indulge with food," probably from a Low German source such as Middle Dutch (compare West Flemish pamperen "cram with food, overindulge;" dialectal German pampen "to cram"), probably from a frequentative of the root of pap (n.1). Meaning "treat luxuriously, overindulge" (transitive) is attested by 1520s. Related: Pampered; pampering.

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munchies (n.)

"food or snack," 1959, plural of munchie "snack eaten to satisfy hunger" (1917), from munch (v.); sense of "craving for food after smoking marijuana" is U.S. stoner slang attested by 1971. Munch (n.) "something to eat" is attested from 1816.

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*pa- 
*pā-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to protect, feed."

It forms all or part of: antipasto; appanage; bannock; bezoar; companion; company; feed; fodder; food; forage; foray; foster; fur; furrier; impanate; pabulum; panatela; panic (n.2) "type of grass;" pannier; panocha; pantry; pastern; pastor; pasture; pester; repast; satrap.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek pateisthai "to feed;" Latin pabulum "food, fodder," panis "bread," pasci "to feed," pascare "to graze, pasture, feed," pastor "shepherd," literally "feeder;" Avestan pitu- "food;" Old Church Slavonic pasti "feed cattle, pasture;" Russian pishcha "food;" Old English foda, Gothic fodeins "food, nourishment."
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poi (n.)
1823, from Hawaiian poi "food made from taro root."
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dog's meat (n.)

"horse flesh, offal, scraps, etc., used as food for dogs," 1590s.

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boarder (n.)
1520s, "one who has food and/or lodging at the house of another," agent noun from board (v.) in the "be supplied with food" sense. Nautical meaning "one who boards (an enemy's) ship" to attack it is from 1769, from a verbal sense derived from board (n.2).
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full (n.)
early 14c., from Old English fyllo, fyllu "fullness (of food), satiety;" also from full (adj.).
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