Etymology
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M.B.A. 

by 1917, American English, abbreviation of Masters of Business Administration, an educational degree attested by that name by 1912.

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brownfield (n.)
abandoned or disused industrial land, often contaminated to some degree, 1992, American English, from brown (adj.) + field (n.).
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oversexed (adj.)

also over-sexed, "inordinately desirous of sex; having sexual properties or tendencies in an excessive degree," 1898; see over- + sex (n.).

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particularly (adv.)

late 14c., particulerli, "separately, individually, specifically;" 1670s, "in a special degree, more than others;" from particular (adj.) + -ly (2).

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superheat (v.)
1827 (implied in superheated) "to heat to a very high degree," specifically of steam until it resembles a perfect gas, from super- + heat (v.). Related: Superheating.
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graduate (v.)
early 15c., "to confer a university degree upon," from Medieval Latin graduatus (see graduate (n.)). Intransitive sense from 1807. Related: Graduated; graduating.
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somedeal (adv.)
"to some degree, somewhat," obsolete, but very common in Old English as sume dæle "some portion, somewhat," from some + deal (n.1).
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utmost (adj.)
Old English utmest (Anglian) "outermost," double superlative of ut "out" (see out (adv.)) + -most. Meaning "being of the greatest or highest degree" is from early 14c.
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grade (n.)

1510s, "degree of measurement," from French grade "grade, degree" (16c.), from Latin gradus "a step, a pace, gait; a step climbed (on a ladder or stair);" figuratively "a step toward something, a degree of something rising by stages," from gradi (past participle gressus) "to walk, step, go," from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go." It replaced Middle English gree "a step, degree in a series," from Old French grei "step," from Latin gradus.

Meaning "inclination of a road or railroad" is from 1811. Meaning "class of things having the same quality or value" is from 1807; meaning "division of a school curriculum equivalent to one year" is from 1835; that of "letter-mark indicating assessment of a student's work" is from 1886 (earlier used of numerical grades). Grade A "top quality, fit for human consumption" (originally of milk) is from a U.S. system instituted in 1912. To figuratively make the grade "be successful" is from 1912; early examples do not make clear whether the literal grade in mind was one of elevation, quality, or scholarship.

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multivalent (adj.)

1869, originally in chemistry, "having more than one degree of valency," from multi- "many" + -valent (see valence in the chemistry sense). Related Multivalence.

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