Etymology
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in-depth (adj.)

"profoundly, with careful attention and deep insight," 1967, from the adjective phrase (attested by 1959); see in (adv.) + depth.

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bombinate (v.)
"make a buzzing noise," 1865, from Latin bombinare, corrupted from bombitare "to hum, buzz," from bombus "a deep, hollow sound; hum, buzz," echoic. Also sometimes bombilate. Related: Bombinated; bombinating.
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weel (n.)
"deep pool," Old English wæl "whirlpool, eddy; pool; sea," cognate with West Frisian wiel, Old Low Frankish wal, Middle Dutch wael, German wehl, wehle.
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bathos (n.)
"ludicrous anticlimax, a descent from the sublime to the ridiculous," 1727, from Greek bathos "depth," which is related to bathys "deep" (see benthos). The word was introduced in this sense by Pope.
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sanguineous (adj.)

1510s, "of the color of blood, of a deep red color;" 1640s, "of or pertaining to blood," from Latin sanguineus "of blood, bloody," from sanguin-, stem of sanguis (see sanguinary).

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saffron (n.)

c. 1200, safroun, "product made from the dried stigmas of flowers of the autumn crocus," from Old French safran (12c.), from Medieval Latin safranum (cognate with Italian zafferano, Spanish azafran), ultimately from Arabic az-za'faran, which is of unknown origin. The substance is noted for its sweet aroma and deep orange color. As a color word for deep yellow-orange, and an adjective, by late 14c. In reference to the crocus plant itself from early 15c. German Safran is from French; Russian shafran' is from Arabic. Related: Saffrony (adj.).

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facilis descensus Averni 
Latin, literally "the descent of Avernus (is) easy" ["Aeneid," VI.126], in reference to Avernus, a deep lake near Puteoli and a reputed entrance to the underworld; hence, "it is easy to slip into moral ruin."
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kylix (n.)

"elegant cup or vase for drinking" (usually broad and shallow, with handles), 1873 (earlier in German), from Greek kylix "cup," which is similar to Latin calix "deep bowl, cup" (see chalice).

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boom (n.2)
"loud, deep, hollow, continued sound," c. 1500, from boom (v.). Compare boondi Aboriginal word for waves breaking on a beach (source of Sydney's Bondi Beach), said to be imitative of the sound.
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coma (n.1)

"state of prolonged unconsciousness," 1640s, from Latinized form of Greek kōma (genitive kōmatos) "deep sleep," which is of uncertain origin. A term for "coma" in Middle English was false sleep (late 14c.). Related: Comal.

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