Etymology
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auroral (adj.)

1550s, "pertaining to dawn," from aurora + -al (1). The meaning "of the color of dawn" is from 1827; the meaning "of the aurora borealis" is from 1828.

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daybreak (n.)

"dawn, first appearance of light in the morning," 1520s, from day + break (n.).

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lighting (n.)
"shining, illumination," Old English lihting "shining, illumination; dawn; lightning," from leoht (see light (n.)).
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Mata Hari 
stage name taken by exotic dancer Margaretha Gertruida Zelle (1876-1917), from Malay (Austronesian) mata "eye" + hari "day, dawn."
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eo- 

word-forming element, used from mid-19c. (first in Eocene) in compound words formed by earth-scientists, and meaning "characterized by the earliest appearance of," from Greek ēōs "dawn, morning, daybreak," also the name of the goddess of the morning, from PIE root *aus- (1) "to shine," especially of the dawn. Piltdown Man, before exposed as a fraud, was known as Eoanthropus.

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cock-crow (n.)

"dawn of the day," mid-15c., from cock (n.1) + crow (v.). An Old English word on a similar notion was hanered.

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alpenglow (n.)
rose-colored light on high mountains before dawn or after dusk, 1871, translating German Alpenglühen; see Alp + glow (v.).
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dawning (n.)

"first appearance of light in the morning," late 13c., verbal noun from dawn (v.). It superseded Middle English dauing, dawing, dayinge, from Old English dagung.

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equus (n.)
"a horse," Latin, from PIE root *ekwo- "horse."
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austral (adj.)

"southern, of or pertaining to the south," 1540s, from Latin australis, from auster "south wind; south," from Proto-Italic *aus-tero- (adj.) "towards the dawn," from PIE *heus-tero- (source also of Sanskrit usra- "red; matutinal," usar-budh- "waking at dawn;" Greek aurion "tomorrow;" Lithuanian aušra "dawn;" Old Church Slavonic jutro "dawn, morning; tomorrow;" Old High German ostara "Easter"), from PIE root *aus- (1) "to shine," especially of the dawn.

The Latin sense shift in auster, if it is indeed the same word other Indo-European languages use for "east," for which Latin uses oriens (see Orient (n.)), perhaps is based on a false assumption about the orientation of the Italian peninsula, "with shift through 'southeast' explained by the diagonal position of the axis of Italy" [Buck]; see Walde, Alois, "Lateinisches etymologisches Wörterbuch," 3rd. ed., vol. I, p.87; Ernout, Alfred, and Meillet, Alfred, "Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue latine," 2nd. ed., p.94.

Or perhaps the connection is more ancient, and from PIE root *aus- "to shine," source of aurora, which also produces words for "burning," with reference to the "hot" south wind that blows into Italy. Thus auster "(hot) south wind," metaphorically extended to "south."

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