Etymology
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impersuadable (adj.)
1763, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + persuadable. [Earliest date in OED 2nd ed. print is a typo.]
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predate (v.)

"to seek prey," 1974, a back-formation from predator, predation, etc. Related: Predated; predating. For the word that means "antedate; pre-exist," see pre-date.

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homophobic (adj.)
by 1971, from homo- (2) "homosexual" + -phobia + -ic. Related: Homophobe; homophobia (which word is said to date from 1969 in this context; earlier "fear of men," by 1908).
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crankshaft (n.)

also crank-shaft, "shaft turned by a crank," 1803, from crank (v.) + shaft (n.). The basic form of the mechanism appears to date from Roman times.

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spell-check (v.)
"to use a computer's spell checker application on a document," by 1985, from spell (v.) + check (v.1). The applications themselves date to the late 1970s. Related: Spell-checked; spell-checking.
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jack-knife (v.)
1776, "to stab," from jack-knife (n.). Intransitive meaning "to fold or bend" the body is said to date from the time of the American Civil War. The truck accident verbal sense is from 1949. Related: Jackknifed; jackknifing.
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fete (n.)
1754, from French fête "festival, feast," from Old French feste "feast, celebration" (see feast (n.)). If the date is right, first used in English by Horace Walpole (1717-1797).
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appointment (n.)
early 15c., "an agreement," also "a fixing of a date for official business," from Old French apointement, from apointer "arrange, settle, place" (see appoint). Meaning "act of placing in office" is attested from 1650s.
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Proto-Indo-European (n.)

the hypothetical reconstructed ancestral language of the Indo-European family, by 1905. The time scale of the "language" itself is much debated, but a recent date proposed for it is about 5,500 years ago. 

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malleolus (n.)

bone knob on either side of the human ankle, 1690s, from Latin malleolus, diminutive of malleus "a hammer" (from PIE root *mele- "to crush, grind"). Anatomical use is said to date to Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564). Related: Malleolar.

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